Chih-Lung Huang

From BR Bullpen

Chih-Lung Huang (黃志龍)

  • Bats Right, Throws Right
  • Height 5' 10", Weight 198 lb.

Biographical Information[edit]

Chih-Lung Huang has pitched for Taiwan at the youth, junior, college and senior levels.

Huang was with Taiwan for the 2005 World Youth Championship and 2006 World Junior Championship. He was MVP of the 2007 Asian Junior Championship, which he led in ERA. He then joined the senior national team for the 2007 Baseball World Cup as the younger player. He was no match for the more experienced players in the World Cup, allowing 15 hits in 6 1/3 innings while only striking out two. He went 0-1 with a 11.37 ERA. He allowed two runs and five hits in 2 1/3 innings in a start versus Spain before Yu-Chiang Liao relieved. He then appeared in relief against Mexico (2 runs in 2 innings) and the United States (1 run in one inning). Despite having the worst ERA on Taiwan up to that point, he was called on to start the 7th/8th place game against Mexico; he promptly raised his ERA further by giving up 3 runs in two innings before leaving in favor of Liao; Mexico went on to win 6-4.

In April 2008, Huang had a workout in Los Angeles, CA before some MLB scouts but only hit 90 mph once during a throwing session, short of the mid-90s he had reached in the past. He was with Taiwan for the 2008 World University Championship, he tossed 2 1/3 scoreless relief innings against South Korea and gave up one run on 3 hits in six in a win over Lithuania.

Huang was 0-1 in the 2009 World Port Tournament but with a 2.12 ERA; he allowed only 12 hits in 17 innings but walked nine. Only Yaumier Sánchez walked more in the tourney; Huang was 6th in opponent average and 11th in ERA. He played in the 2009 Asian Championship.

Huang signed with the Yomiuri Giants for 2010. He made his Nippon Pro Baseball debut on June 9. He threw three shutout innings to start the game against the Orix Buffaloes but allowed two in the fourth and was relieved.

Huang throws a fastball (tops out at 94 mph), slider, forkball and a shuuto (two-seamer).

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