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Tsuyoshi Yoda

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Tsuyoshi Yoda

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[edit] Biographical information

Tsuyoshi Yoda is a former Nippon Professional Baseball and minor league pitcher who played in Japan in the 1990s and in the San Diego Padres organization in 1996. He was hampered by circulatory and elbow problems in his career.

He was a number one draft pick by the Chunichi Dragons in 1989 after pitching for NTT Tokyo in the industrial leagues. He also pitched for the Japanese national team in the 1989 Intercontinental Cup.

With the Dragons in 1990, he made 50 appearances, saving 31 games (leading the Central League) with a 4-5 record and posting a 3.26 ERA. He gave up only 64 hits in 88 1/3 innings. He was the Central League's Rookie of the Year and Fireman of the Year and also made the All-Star team. He made 29 appearances in 1991, losing 3 games (winning none), saving two games and posting a 3.18 ERA.

In 1992, Yoda appeared in 41 games, saving 23 of them and posting a 3.48 ERA. He was 2-5 but struck out 69 while allowing 60 hits in 72 1/3 IP. He made his second and last CL All-Star team. Over the next three seasons (1993-1995), he would appear in only 15, seven and five games, respectively, and post ERAs of 9.78, 12.00 and 12.00, respectively as he battled injuries.

He was signed by the Padres, and played in 11 games for their Double-A affiliate the Memphis Chicks in 1996. He would appear in nine games, going 0-0 with a 11.74 ERA.

Back in Japan, he played for the Chiba Lotte Marines minor league team in 1996 and 1997, and the Nippon Ham Fighters organization from 1998 to 1999. He resurfaced in NPB briefly in '99, allowing one run in one inning. He was signed by Hanshin for the 2000 season and retired after the season in the minors.

Overall in NPB, Yoda was 8-19 with 59 saves and a 4.58 ERA in 148 games.

Following his playing career, he worked as an analyst for NHK broadcasts. He served as the bullpen coach for the 2009 World Baseball Classic Japanese team, which won the title.

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