You Are Here > Baseball-Reference.com > Bullpen > Tampa Bay Rays - BR Bullpen

Tampa Bay Rays

From BR Bullpen

(Redirected from Tampa Bay Devil Rays)
Jump to: navigation, search
TampaRays.jpg

Previously known as Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1998-2007)

First Game: March 31, 1998 vs. Detroit Tigers at Tropicana Field 6-11

Franchise Record: (through 2014) 1,272-1,480 (.462)

Postseason Record: 13-17 (.433)

World Series Titles: 0

American League Pennants: 1 (2008)

Postseasons: 4 (2008, 2010, 2011, 2013)

Ballpark: Tropicana Field (March 31, 1998-)

Franchise Players: Carl Crawford, Aubrey Huff, Scott Kazmir, Evan Longoria, David Price, Ben Zobrist

Retired Numbers: 12 - Wade Boggs; 42 - Jackie Robinson (retired throughout Major League Baseball); 66 - Don Zimmer

[edit] Team History

Tampa Bay Devil Rays logo

The Tampa Bay Rays were created in the expansion of 1998 as the Tampa Bay Devil Rays and finished last in AL East Division six consecutive years, from 1998 to 2003, and again from 2005 to 2007. Their luck changed when they changed their name before the 2008 season, when they went all the way to the World Series. The Rays play at Tropicana Field, the last remaining fully enclosed ballpark in the major leagues. A number of All-Stars and veterans have been among the Rays Managers and Coaches in their history.

The Devil Rays finished fourth in 2004 with 70 wins, the most in franchise history and their only non last-place finish under their original name. By the end of the 2007 season, they had the worst franchise winning percentage of all current teams. They also had the worst attendance in the American League each season from 2001 to 2005.

Current owner Stuart Sternberg took the club over from Vince Naimoli after the 2005 season.

Their fortunes turned around dramatically at the time the team adopted its current name. Led by a core of youngsters including pitchers Scott Kazmir, James Shields and Matt Garza, OF B.J. Upton, C Dioner Navarro and 3B Evan Longoria, the Rays suddenly emerged as one of baseball's best teams in 2008. They kept pace with the World Champion Boston Red Sox early in the season, and saw the New York Yankees progressively drop away from the race. They bested their previous team-high for wins by late August and outpaced the Red Sox down the stretch to win the AL East title outright and finish with the second-best record in the American League at 97-65.

In the ALDS, the Rays defeated the Chicago White Sox in four games thanks to strong pitching and power hitting by Longoria and Upton, then defeated the Red Sox in the ALCS with Garza winning two games, including the deciding 7th game, and the entire team continuing its hot hitting. However, the fairy tale came to an end in the 2008 World Series, as the Rays lost in five games to the Philadelphia Phillies. Still, the team had gone in one season from a laughingstock to one of baseball's best teams, with a core of young players promising more success in future years.

Indeed the Rays were able to maintain a strong level of play over the following few seasons. In spite of playing in perhaps the strongest division in Major League Baseball, they returned to the postseason in 2010, 2011 and 2013, under the leadership of manager Joe Maddon. However, they were only able to win one postseason series in that stretch, and that was the 2013 American League Wild Card Game, when they defeated the Cleveland Indians. While 3B Longoria and P Price were fixtures with the team during the whole 2008-2013 period, the team was characterized by an important turnover in personnel, with players being traded when they became too expensive, and often being replaced by other developed by the organization, or acquired before they had become established major leaguers. Home grown players included P Jeremy Hellickson and Alex Cobb and OF Desmond Jennings, while youngsters who became regulars with the Rays included players such as OFs Matt Joyce and Wil Myers, IF/OF Ben Zobrist and P Chris Archer. Established players who left during the period included Ps Kazmir, Shields and Garza and OF Upton. Because of the constant turnover of players, analysts kept predicting a plunge to the bottom of the standings, but the Rays managed to stay competitive during the entire period, never finishing lower than 3rd, and with at least 90 wins in five of the six seasons (they got 84 in the other).

The 2014 season marked a turning point for the organization. Expecting to contend again, the Rays started the year playing .500 then went into a terrible slump in May and June, falling to 18 games below .500. However, they began to turn things around, and were approaching the break-even point at the trading deadline when they sent a message that they had no plan of competing for the postseason when they traded their ace, David Price, in return for youngsters. They still managed to make it to .500, albeit briefly, on August 15th, becoming only the fourth team in history to do so after having been as many as 18 games below .500. However, they couldn't stay there, and eventually ended up with their first losing season since they were the Devil Rays, back in 2007. Important changes followed after the season, as highly-respected GM Andrew Friedman, tired of working within a confined budget, left to accept the job of president of the Los Angeles Dodgers, while Maddon decided soon after to exercise an option to terminate his contract and was quickly hired by the Chicago Cubs. Replacing them were Matt Silverman, Friedman's long-time assistant, as GM, and Kevin Cash, a former back-up catcher with the Rays getting his first managerial opportunity at any level. The trades also continued, with long-time fixtures Matt Joyce and Ben Zobrist, as well Wil Myers, the Rookie of the Year two years earlier, all leaving town. The new team brass explained that there would need to be some rebuilding before the Rays would compete again, although their pipeline of young players was still strong.

The Rays' main problem has always been their ballpark, Tropicana Field. Built in the early 1990s based on a template from the previous decades, before the Tampa Bay area had a ball club in its sights, it was already outdated by the time it opened as a major league venue, as Toronto's SkyDome had demonstrated that a retractable roof was the way to go in terms of protection from the weather, whereas Baltimore's Camden Yards brought in a wave of parks integrated into the downtown core of the city they served. Tropicana Field was none of this, modeled as it was on some of the least-liked ballparks in baseball history. The Rays always had difficulty attracting fans to the gloomy and unattractive ballpark, even when they were consistent winners, but attempts to find another home in the metropolitan area were stymied by a punitive lease, and difficulties in getting the various cities of the region to agree to work towards a common goal. As a result, by the mid 2010s, with their in-state rivals the Miami Marlins having gained a bit of more solid footing in their new downtown ballpark, the Rays were universally regarded as the weakest franchise in the majors, with some even whispering that the end-result could well be relocation if no solution was found in a reasonable time span.


[edit] Further Reading

  • Jonah Keri: The Extra 2%: How Wall Street Strategies Took a Major League Baseball Team from Worst to First, ESPN Books, Random House, New York, NY, 2011. ISBN 978-0345517654

Source: http://www.ballparks.com


Seasons
1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015
    MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL    

NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERN DIVISION

Atlanta Braves
Miami Marlins
New York Mets
Philadelphia Phillies
Washington Nationals

CENTRAL DIVISION

Chicago Cubs
Cincinnati Reds
Milwaukee Brewers
Pittsburgh Pirates
St. Louis Cardinals

WESTERN DIVISION

Arizona Diamondbacks
Colorado Rockies
Los Angeles Dodgers
San Diego Padres
San Francisco Giants


AMERICAN LEAGUE
EASTERN DIVISION

Baltimore Orioles
Boston Red Sox
New York Yankees
Tampa Bay Rays
Toronto Blue Jays

CENTRAL DIVISION

Chicago White Sox
Cleveland Indians
Detroit Tigers
Kansas City Royals
Minnesota Twins

WESTERN DIVISION

Houston Astros
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
Oakland Athletics
Seattle Mariners
Texas Rangers


Postseasons | Awards | Ballparks | Minor Leagues

Personal tools