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Scott Stricklin

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Scott Alan Stricklin

BR Minors page

[edit] Biographical Information

Scott Stricklin reached AAA in the minors then became a college coach.

A catcher, Stricklin was picked by the Minnesota Twins in the 23rd round of the 1993 amateur draft following his junior season at Kent State. He made his professional debut with the Elizabethton Twins that year, hitting .192/.284/.224. He bounced around the Twins system in 1994, appearing for the Fort Wayne Wizards (.302/.399/.401 in 65 G), the Nashville Xpress (9 for 30, 4 2B, 7 BB) and the Salt Lake Buzz (0 for 2). Had he qualified, he would have tied Kevin Millar and Kary Bridges for 7th in the Midwest League in batting average.

In 1995, Scott slumped to .187/.348/.193 for the Fort Myers Miracle, with one extra-base hit (a double) in 166 AB. Two positives were a high walk rate and a 43% caught stealing rate. He also completed his college degree that year. Let go by the Twins, he signed with the Atlanta Braves and batted .145/.242/.176 in 45 contests for their Greenville Braves affiliate.

He next signed with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. In 1997, he hit .259/.393/.294 for the St. Petersburg Devil Rays to finish second on the club in OBP behind Greg Blosser. Stricklin was the primary starter behind the dish that season for St. Petersburg. After attending spring training in 1998 with Tampa Bay, he retired as a player.

Scott was a volunteer coach at Georgia Tech in 1998-1999. He was pitching coach for the Vanderbilt University in 2000-2001. From 2002-2004, he was assistant coach at his Georgia Tech. He was their recruiting coordinator when they had the #1-ranked recruiting class in 2002, including Micah Owings and Tyler Greene.

In 2005, Strickling returned to Kent State as head coach. He was named Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year in 2006 after taking Kent State to the title. In his first five years, he was 183-103.

In 2014 Stricklin moved to the University of Georgia.

[edit] Sources

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