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Paul Cobb

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John Paul Cobb

  • Bats Right, Throws Right
  • Height 6' 0", Weight 165 lb.
  • School Georgia Tech

Minor League page

[edit] Biography

"Paul Cobb, Ty's brother, is rising rapidly in the game." - from Baseball and Georgia by Alex Lynn
"Paul Cobb is a brilliant young athlete . . . and is considered as promising as his wonderful brother was at the same age." - the August Chronicle, quoted in the book Ty Cobb: Safe at Home

The brother of Ty Cobb, outfielder Paul Cobb played minor league ball from 1907 to 1916. He led the 1908 Western Association with 10 triples and the 1914 Union Association with 43 doubles. Cobb only had six seasons of over 100 games played, but he stole 20 bases five times, including 48 in 1911 with the Lincoln Railsplitters.

The New York Times reported that a pitched ball broke his arm on Sept. 11, 1912 while he was playing for Lincoln.

Overall Cobb played 1,001 games hitting .283 with 206 2B, 543 R, and 189 SB.

Cobb also managed the Jacksonville Tarpons for part of 1916.

According to the book Forward Together, he played service ball (as a pitcher) at Parris Island in 1918.

One site says he was a real estate developer in Florida. Sarasota

One source says that Cobb actually played pro ball for 15 years, and then was a candy salesman before moving to Florida to become a real estate broker and insurance salesman. He was a county school commissioner and had a role in bringing the Boston Red Sox to Sarasota for spring training at the time.

"Paul Cobb, brother of Ty Cobb, is being sought by the local (major league) club, on recommendation of Bob Unglaub, who is managing the Lincoln team, of the Western League, on which the younger Cobb is playing. Cobb is leading the league outfielders and is batting .367, and may be seen here, either before or at the end of the Western League season, if the negotiations are successful." - Sporting Life's Washington correspondent, June 3, 1911
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