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Miami Marlins

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Note: This page is for the major league Miami Marlins. For minor league teams which have played under that name, click here

Miami Marlins logo 2012.jpg

Previously known as Florida Marlins (1993-2011)

Franchise Record: (through 2014) 1,642-1,853 (.470)

Post Season Record: 22-12 (.647)

World Series Titles: 2 (1997, 2003)

National League Pennants: 2 (1997, 2003)

Playoffs: 2 (1997, 2003)

Ballpark: Sun Life Stadium (1993-2011); Marlins Park (2012-)

Franchise Players: Jeff Conine, Gary Sheffield, Dontrelle Willis, Miguel Cabrera, Hanley Ramirez, Giancarlo Stanton

[edit] Team History

Mascots Billy and Officer Snook
Florida Marlins Logo (1993-2011)

The Miami Marlins are a National League expansion club that began play in 1993 as the Florida Marlins (see Expansion of 1993). They changed their name in 2012 when they moved to a new ballpark in downtown Miami, FL, resurrecting a name that had been used by minor league teams in the past. The change of name was a condition imposed by the city in return for helping to finance the new playing facility.

The Marlins' first selection in the expansion draft was outfielder Nigel Wilson of the Toronto Blue Jays. Led by manager Rene Lachemann and star outfielder Gary Sheffield, the club struggled in its first few seasons, as expected, but began to build a decent foundation. Lachemann was fired in 1996 and owner Wayne Huizenga began to splurge on free agent signings.

Jim Leyland took over as manager in 1997 and armed with a pitching staff of Kevin Brown, Al Leiter, and Alex Fernandez, and a team boosted by a number of high-priced veterans, led the Marlins to the wild card. The team upset the Atlanta Braves in the National League Championship Series and went on to defeat the Cleveland Indians in an exciting seven-game World Series.

After winning the world championship, owner Huizenga decided to dismantle his club in what would become known as the first great Marlins fire sale. Within a couple of years, virtually every star of the 1997 club was gone, and in fact the 1998 edition of the team set a record for most losses by a defending World Series champion. The roller-coaster experience left a bitter taste in the mouths of fans and observers. Performance and attendance suffered, and Huizenga sold the team to John Henry. In 2002, Henry in turn sold the team to Jeffrey Loria as part of a game of musical chairs that landed him the Boston Red Sox, and made the Montreal Expos wards of Major League Baseball. The team's fortunes began to improve, especially as Loria brought with him the Expos' coaching staff, spring training complex and scouts. During the 2003 season, manager Jeff Torborg was replaced with Jack McKeon. Players responded to the change, and McKeon led the club to another wild card. After upsetting the San Francisco Giants in the Division Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in the League Championship Series. Again they scored an unexpected World Series victory, defeating the New York Yankees in six games.

In each of the next two seasons, the Marlins finished third in the NL East with a 83-79 record. After the 2005 season, owner Loria announced that without a new stadium, the club would be forced to relocate after the team's current lease ended. Within days of the announcement, the team drastically cut its payroll by dealing highly-paid stars Carlos Delgado, Mike Lowell, Luis Castillo, Paul Lo Duca, Juan Pierre, and Josh Beckett in the second great Marlins fire sale. The Marlins surprised fans in 2006, going 78-84 and even contending for the wild card for a time, despite having a lineup mainly made up of rookies and cast-offs. However, after the season, skipper Joe Girardi was fired due to differences with management, starting a merry go-round of managers that would continue into the next decade. Low-key Fredi Gonzalez took over and by 2009 had the team finishing second behind the Philadelphia Phillies, thanks to solid performances by youngsters Hanley Ramirez, Dan Uggla, Chris Coghlan and Josh Johnson.

However, the Marlins failed to take the next step in 2010 and flailed around .500. A frustrated Loria had Gonzalez fired, tried unsuccessfully to attract a big-name manager, and then settled on Edwin Rodriguez, a skipper very much in the mold of the man he replaced. The Marlins continued to develop good young players, with Gaby Sanchez, Giancarlo Stanton and Logan Morrison all getting their first regular playing time that season. When the Marlins hit a dreadful slump in June of 2011, Loria changed skippers again; gone was Rodriguez, and back came McKeon, now aged 83. The Marlins played better for a month, but with Hanley Ramirez and Omar Infante injured in August, Josh Johnson gone for the season, and Chris Coghlan unproductive after winning the Rookie of the Year Award two seasons earlier, they had another dreadful month, sinking to the bottom of the NL East standings, a bad omen as they were counting down the games remaining before they would leave their unloved football stadium for a custom-made ballpark in downtown Miami, FL where they would play in 2012 under the name Miami Marlins.

Marlins Park opened with a splash for the newly renamed Miami team, which also boasted a new skipper in Ozzie Guillen and some high-priced free agents in Jose Reyes, Mark Buehrle and Heath Bell. After starting the season well, however, the team quickly fell to the bottom of the NL East standings, where they finished the year with a record of 69-93, 29 games out of first place. Guillen clashed with both owner Loria and his players, and a number of strong performers from previous years, such as Gaby Sanchez, Hanley Ramirez, Omar Infante and Anibal Sanchez, were traded away during the year. Guillen was fired shortly after the end of the season, to be replaced by Mike Redmond, a member of the 2003 World Series-winning team. The Marlins completely changed tack that offseason, trading Bell away, and then pulling off a huge blockbuster deal with the Toronto Blue Jays that saw most of the team's other veterans leave town, headed by the previous year's other free agent signees, Buehrle and Reyes, accompanied by ace Josh Johnson, C John Buck and IF/OF Emilio Bonifacio. In return, the Marlins received a package of mainly young players, in another of the periodic house-cleanings with which the franchise had become synonymous in its short history. It was quickly dubbed the third great Marlins fire sale, with observers and fans expressing disgust at being taken on another ride.

[edit] Marlins Managers

Rene Lachemann 1993-1996

Cookie Rojas 1996 (interim)

John Boles 1996, 1999-2001

Jim Leyland 1997-1998

Tony Perez 2001

Jeff Torborg 2002-2003

Jack McKeon 2003-2005

Joe Girardi 2006

Fredi Gonzalez 2007-2010

Edwin Rodriguez 2010-2011

Brandon Hyde 2011 (interim)

Jack McKeon 2011

Ozzie Guillen 2012

Mike Redmond 2013

Miami Marlins Managers and Coaches

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