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Joe Mauer

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Joseph Patrick Mauer

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[edit] Biographical Information

Joe Mauer

Joe Mauer has made a name for himself as a top catcher in the majors at a young age. Mauer was 3 for 9 in the 1999 World Junior Championship, which the US won; he backed up Scott Heard at catcher; despite his backup role, he would go on to one of the brightest careers from the team (Carlos Quentin was the only other future All-Star). Mauer was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 1st round of the 2001 amateur draft. He was signed by scout Mark Wilson and made his pro debut that summer.

At age 21, in 2004, he was already hitting .308 in the majors (in 35 games), at age 22 he hit .294 as the regular catcher for the Minnesota Twins in 2005, and at age 23 spent most of the 2006 season sitting atop the American League list of batting leaders. He became the first catcher to win the batting title in the American League by compiling a .347 average to beat Derek Jeter by four points; Hall of Famer Ernie Lombardi had been a batting champion in the National League. In 2008, Mauer won a second title, although his .328 average was one of the lowest among batting title winners in recent years. On June 4, 2008, Mauer hit a two-run sacrifice fly, the first of its kind in the majors in over 7 years. In 2009, he won the title again; that year, he was also named the American League MVP after hitting .365/.444/.587 in 138 games. He hit 28 homers that year, more than twice his next best single-season total, of 13 in 2006. The Wall Street Journal ran an article in September of that year to the effect that Mauer and Jeter were the top candidates for the 2009 MVP award. Sabermetricians were said to feel that Mauer was clearly the top offensive player, but Jeter's team was in front and there was a lot of sentiment for Jeter to win his first MVP award. In the end, Mauer came out on top.

While Mauer's power went down to his more traditional level in 2010, when the Twins moved to the more pitcher-friendly Target Field, he managed to keep his batting average quite high, at .327, even though he hit only 9 homers. His 88 runs, 75 RBI and 65 walks still made him an extremely effective offensive player, as witnessed by his OPS+ of 140. However, he was bothered by a string of injuries early in 2011 and he did not hit his first homer of the year until July 27th, in his 46th game. He ended that season at .287 with 3 homers and 30 RBI in only 82 games, giving rise to concern that he was paying the toll for playing all those games behind the plate in previous seasons. In spite of his struggles, his OPS+ was still above 100, at 102, for the 8th straight season, given his many other ways of contributing to the Twins offense. That offense was quite anemic that year, when the injury-racked team not only missed the postseason, but fell to the cellar in the AL Central.

Mauer was also a top high school quarterback. He was selected the Player of the Year by USA Today in 2000 and was slated to play both football and baseball for Florida State University before turning pro. However, Mauer was the #1 overall pick in the 2001 amateur draft, prompting him to abandon plans to go to college. As a local Minnesota boy, he was considered to be a "signability pick" ahead of the more-heralded Mark Prior and Mark Teixeira, but hindsight has shown the Twins made a perfectly good choice. Throughout his minor league career Mauer was considered to be one of the best prospects in the minors and he was named the 2003 Minor League Player of the Year by Baseball America.

Mauer, despite being taller and much younger than most catchers, has been considered an elite defender from the time he reached the majors. There has always been concern, however, that the strain of catching full-time would affect him more than other players and that he would need to move to the outfield or first base at some point. His injuries early in the 2011 season only increased this talk. On August 27, 2012, Mauer caught his 832nd game as a Twin, passing Earl Battey for the most in Minnesota history. Following his previous injury-plagued season, manager Ron Gardenhire had begun using him more carefully that year, giving him more frequent starts at first base or DH in order to preserve his health for the longer term.

Mauer on first, during a game in Toronto. October 2012

Mauer has broken up three no-hitters in the 9th inning, doing so against Gavin Floyd (May 6, 2008), Neftali Feliz (a combined attempt with Rich Harden August 23, 2010) and Anibal Sanchez (May 24, 2013). In 2013, he played 113 games and hit extremely well, putting up a batting line of .324/.404/.476 with 35 doubles and 11 homers. However, he only had 47 RBIs for the last-place Twins, and on August 19th suffered a concussion when he took a foul ball off his mask in a game against the New York Mets. While he had hoped to come back, the Twins decided in late September to shut him down for the remainder of the year, as there was no point risking further injury with nothing to play for. He had been hitting extremely well when the injury occurred, going 17 for 43 (.395) over his last 10 games, including a 5-for-7 game in which he homered and collected 4 RBIs against the Cleveland Indians on August 14th. He was presented with a fifth Silver Slugger Award after the season, but a few days later, with long-time 1B Justin Morneau having left the team, the Twins announced he would move to first base permanently in order to preserve his long-term health.

The most similar player to Mauer, based on similarity scores, is Mickey Cochrane, although Cochrane never won a batting title. Two other Hall of Fame catchers, Bill Dickey and Yogi Berra, are among his top five similar players, although even Cochrane, with a 900 score in 2011, is not a particularly good comparison.

He has two brothers, Jake and Bill, who played in the Twins minor league system.

[edit] Notable Achievements


AL MVP
2008 2009 2010
Dustin Pedroia Joe Mauer Josh Hamilton

[edit] Further Reading

  • Charlie Beattie: "The Legacy of Twins Legends: Killebrew, Carew, Puckett, and Mauer", in Daniel R. Leavitt, ed.: Short but Wondrous Summers: Baseball in the North Star State, The National Pastime, SABR, Number 42, 2012, pp. 88-92.

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