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Geoffrey Kohl

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Geoffrey Kohl also listed as Geoffry

  • Bats Left, Throws Left
  • Height 5' 11", Weight 172 lb.

Olympics-Reference page

Geoffrey Kohl spent 1988-1997 with the Dutch national team. Domestically, he led the Hoofdklasse in all three pitching Triple Crown categories, but in three different seasons.

Kohl went 1-0 with a 4.50 ERA in the 1988 Baseball World Cup; the 19-year-old easily led the Orange in ERA, as Harry Koster (7.45) came next. His victory came against the Netherlands Antilles. He helped the Dutch win a Bronze at the 1989 European Championship. During the 1990 Hoofdklasse season, he was 8-1 with Neptunus to lead the loop in winning percentage.

In the 1990 Baseball World Cup, Geoffrey allowed 16 hits in 9 2/3 innings with a 10.24 ERA; only Eric de Vries and Rene Rijst were worse for the Orange. Kohl helped the Netherlands to a Silver in the 1991 European Championship. In the 1993 European Championship, they took Gold.

The Neptunus southpaw led the Hoofdklasse with 123 strikeouts in 1993. In the 1994 Baseball World Cup, he went 2-0 with a 1.80 ERA, capturing half of the Netherlands' victories as their lone left-hander. He tied Rolando Arrojo, Lazaro Valle, Dong-hwan Moon, Osvaldo Fernandez and 8 others for second in wins in the Cup, one behind Japan's Masanori Sugiura. He beat Sweden and Puerto Rico.

Kohl paced the '96 Hoofdklasse with a 3.07 ERA and won Pitcher of the Year for the lone time. He had a 1-1, 6.30 record in the 1996 Haarlem Baseball Week then was 0-2 in the 1996 Olympics with 18 hits and 12 runs in 9 2/3 IP. He tied Peter Callenbach for the team lead in losses, but his 9.31 ERA was still better than team average, trailing only Paul Nanne and Rob Cordemans on the squad. He took losses against Japan and Nicaragua.

Geoffrey was 2-0 with a 1.80 ERA in the 1997 European Championship as the Netherlands won a Silver Medal again.

Kohl was retired by 2000.

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