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Ed Doheny

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Edward Richard Doheny

  • Bats Left, Throws Left
  • Height 5' 10½", Weight 165 lb.

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"Eddie Doheny has been pursued by a hoodoo, the likes of which has never been seen. The last six games he pitched have been lost. Game after game has the Green Mountain lad pitched that should have been an easy victory for New York. On several occasions he has allowed his opponents but four or five hits, and yet he has seen the games slip from his hands because of errors behind him at the most critical times, and because of the weakest kind of batting by Anson's boys. Doheny must feel greatly discouraged, and yet it seems that he is hoodooed." - Sporting Life of July 2, 1898 about a year when Eddie Doheny went 7-19
"Eddie Doheny is pitching the best ball of his life this summer. It took Doheny years to get good, and now he is a corker." - Sporting Life, July 12, 1902

Ed Doheny pitched nine years in the big leagues. During most of his big-league career, he pitched for the New York Giants and never had a winning record. However, during the last part of his career, he pitched for the Pittsburgh Pirates and went 38-14 over a 2 1/2 year period.

Sporting Life of July 8, 1899 reported on a time when he gave up seven consecutive walks, breaking "several records".

Doheny joined the Pirates in July 1901, and was part of a team that won the National League pennant each year from 1901 to 1903.

Doheny's life is a tragic story, though. He began to exhibit symptoms of mental illness during the 1903 season, and left the team. He came back, pitched well, and then was given a leave of absence. He was not present with the Pirates when they played in the first World Series in the 20th Century. His condition worsened and he was finally committed to an insane asylum. He died in another institution in 1916.

"Eddie Doheny's pitching against the Bostons last Saturday was great. He struck out nine Beaneaters and had speed to burn." - Sporting Life from June 17, 1899

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