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Doc Crandall

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James Otis Crandall

  • Bats Right, Throws Right
  • Height 5' 10½", Weight 180 lb.

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[edit] Biographical Information

Known for his sharp curveball, Doc Crandall was one of the first pitchers to be used primarily in relief. While with John McGraw's New York Giants, Crandall picked up his nickname due to his ability to help recuperate "sick" Giant games.

Crandall was also one of the last major league players to split his time between pitching and playing the field during the same season - on the St. Louis Terriers in 1914, Crandall tied for the team lead in wins and also was the main second baseman. Crandall was used as a pinch-hitter over 100 times in his big-league career.

Crandall continued to pitch until until he was 41 years old, winning 11 games in the Pacific Coast League as late as 1929. Overall he won 249 minor league contests, giving him 351 career wins as a professional. He pitched 13 seasons in the Pacific Coast League (1916-1926 and 1928-1929), with a 230-151 record and a 2.96 ERA over 3,331 innings.

Crandall was player/manager of the 1927-1928 Wichita Larks. After his playing career ended, Crandall was a coach for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1931 to 1934. He then managed the Des Moines Demons in 1935, and coached the Seattle Indians in 1937 and Sacramento Solons in 1938. In 1943 Crandall was elected to the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.

His son Jimmie Crandall never reached the majors as a player but spent a season as a St. Louis Browns coach. A brother, Karl Crandall, was a minor league infielder from 1907 to 1924. In 1918, Karl broke up a no-hit bid by Doc with 2 outs in the ninth inning.

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