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Dan Meyer (meyerda02)

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Daniel Livingston Meyer

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[edit] Biographical Information

Dan Meyer, one of two players by that name who have played in the major leagues, pitched 2 games at age 22 for the 2004 Atlanta Braves. He returned to the major leagues late in the 2007 season with the Oakland Athletics.

Meyer attended James Madison University and had a record of 9-2 with an ERA of 3.15 in 2002. He was drafted # 34 in the first round by the Braves in the 2002 amateur draft. He was signed by scout J.J. Picollo and made his pro debut that summer. In the minors from 2002-2004, he pitched well, with ERA's that were always better than 3.00 in the rookie league, Single A, Double A, and Triple A.

In his two games in the majors in 2004, he gave up no runs in 2 innings. The Braves won the division that year, and Meyer was the youngest pitcher on a staff whose age averaged 30.1 years old.

Meyer was included in a major trade in December 2004 with the Oakland Athletics; he was sent to Oakland alongside pitcher Juan Cruz and outfielder Charles Thomas for ace pitcher Tim Hudson. He was considered the key player in that deal for Oakland, but he spent the 2005 and 2006 with the Sacramento Rivercats of the PCL battling injuries both seasons. He went 2-8, 5.36, the first year and 3-3, 5.32, the second.

In 2007, Meyer pitched one game with the AA Midland RockHounds before returning to Sacramento. Finally healthy, he had a solid season, posting an 8-2 record with a 3.28 ERA in 21 starts, while striking out 105 batters in 115 innings. He made his Oakland debut in mid-August, returned to AAA, and was called up again when rosters expanded after September 1. However, American League batters gave him some trouble, as he gave up 20 hits and 9 walks in 16 innings for a 8.82 ERA. Still, he has regained his status as a top prospect.

Meyer became a coach with the Danville Braves in 2014.

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