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Clint Myers

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Clinton A. Myers

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[edit] Biographical Information

Clint Myers is the father of former first-rounder Corey Myers and Casey Myers, a frequent .300 hitter in the minors. Clint reached AAA himself as a player and then became a coach. Clint was picked by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 36th round of the 1970 amateur draft out of high school. Clint went on to Arizona State University, where he played in the 1972 College World Series and 1973 College World Series. The latter year, he was named to the All-Tournament team at catcher and ASU made it to the finals before falling, 4-3, to Southern California.

The Cardinals again picked Myers, this time in the fourth round of the 1973 amateur draft. He hit .281/.368/.354 for the 1973 Modesto Reds; the lone real negative was 24 passed balls in 56 games, but that was actually a better rate than Modesto's alternative, Kala Ka'aihue, Sr. In 1974, Myers played for Modesto (24 PB to tie for the California League lead; a .283/.372/.333 line), the St. Petersburg Cardinals (5 for 27, 4 BB, 2 2B) and the AAA Tulsa Oilers (0 for 3, an error). As a good-contact but poor-fielding catcher, Myers was cast in the same mold as his son Casey.

Myers coached Casa Grande Union High School from 1977-1979 and led them to the Arizona state title in 1978. He was coach at Yavapai College from 1981-1983, winning titles each year. He was assistant coach at the Eastern Washington University in '84, also earning his master's degree there.

Myers then coached softball at Central Arizona College from 1987-1995, going 481-43 and winning six national titles. He was named to the NJCAA Softball Hall of Fame in 1998. From 1996-2005, he was head coach of Central Arizona College's baseball team, posting a 406-192 record and going to the Junior College World Series twice. He was named NJCAA Coach of the Year in 2002.

Myers was hired as head softball coach at Arizona State in 2006. He went 220-54 in his first four years, winning the school's first NCAA title in 2008. To that point, he had won over 1,100 games as a college baseball and softball head coach.

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