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Charlie Bicknell

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Charles Stephen Bicknell
(Bud)

  • Bats Right, Throws Right
  • Height 5' 11", Weight 170 lb.

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[edit] Biographical Information

Right-hander Charlie "Buddy" Bicknell pitched two years in the majors with the Philadelphia Phillies.

Bicknell signed with the Phillies and made his pro debut with the Wilmington Blue Rocks of the class B Interstate League in 1947. The 18-year-old won 5 and lost 3 in 17 appearances while pitching 87 innings. He threw well enough that Philadelphia brought him to Shibe Park in 1948 for a closer look, and the youngster spent the next two seasons with the club. During his two-year run in the big leagues, he went 0-1 with a 6.83 ERA while appearing in 30 games and pitching 54 innings. This would be the sum-total of Charlie's time in the major leagues.

On April 10, 1950, Bicknell was selected off waivers by the Boston Braves, and he split 1950 between the Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association and the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association. He appeared in four games for the Crackers with no decisions and went 0-2 in 7 games for the Brewers. He was out of baseball from the middle part of the 1950 year and the entire season of 1951. There are no official findings as to his whereabouts during this time span and he could have been on the disabled list or possibly serving in the Korean War. He returned to the ballpark in 1952 and spent that season with the Hartford Chiefs of the class A Eastern League, finishing up with a 9-12 record and a 3.84 ERA while pitching 176 innings.

Bicknell spent five more seasons (1953-1957) in the high minors, all in AA or AAA ball, putting together four double-digit win seasons. His best mark came in 1953 with the AAA Milwaukee Brewers. when he went 15-10 with a 4.07 ERA in 35 appearances while pitching 197 innings. He stayed with the game through 1957, going 1-6 with three different clubs. <At the age of 28, he decided to call it a career and finished out his 8-season minor league run with a 59-59 record in 238 games.

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