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Chang-Heng Hsieh

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Chang-Heng Hsieh (謝長亨)

  • Bats Right, Throws Right
  • Height 5' 10", Weight 178 lb.

Chang-Heng Hsieh was the first pitcher in the Chinese Professional Baseball League to reach 100 career wins. He later became a coach, manager and broadcaster. His main pitch was a forkball.

Hsieh pitched for Taiwan in the 1986 Amateur World Series and 1987 World Port Tournament. He played for Isuzu Motors in Japan's industrial leagues. When the Chinese Professional Baseball League was formed, Hsieh joined the Uni-President Lions.

Hsieh was 11-9 with a 2.99 ERA for the Lions in 1991. In 1992, he went 9-7 with a 2.89, followed by a 13-3, 2.88 campaign the next year. The 1994 season saw him turn in a 12-7, 2.91 record. In 1995, he went 12-11 with a 2.81 ERA. His ERA finally rose over 3 in 1996 when it hit 3.92; his record was 12-7. In 1997, Hsieh was 7-3 with a 2.39 ERA. The next season, he turned in a 6-12, 2.98 ledger for his first losing record in 8 years in the CPBL. Hsieh was 10-5 with a 2.88 ERA in 1999 and 7-11 with a 3.50 ERA in 2000. Hsieh had a 10.13 ERA and only one decision in his final season, 2001, but the decision was a win on April 28 to give him 100 for his career. He was the first CPBL hurler to reach triple digits in wins. He was 100-81 with a 3.02 ERA in 10 years in the CPBL.

The right-hander retired to become the Lions' pitching coach in 2002. From 2003-2005, he managed the Lions, going 108-79-13 his first two seasons but slipping to 24-26 in 2005 before being fired. He became a commentator for 2006 before being hired as the pitching coach of the China Trust Whales. In 2007, he became the Whales manager, going 46-52-2 his first year and only 39-61 in 2008. He was manager of the Brother Elephants in 2013, going 55-65.

Hsieh has coached for Taiwan's national team, including in the 2006 World Baseball Classic, 2007 Baseball World Cup, 2007 Asian Championship and 2008 Olympics.

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