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Barry Enright

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Barry Ryan Enright

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Pitcher Barry Enright, in his first year at Pepperdine University (2005), went 10-1 with a 4.62 ERA in 18 starts. The following year, he went 13-2 with a 4.05 ERA in 21 games (20 starts). In 2007, he went 12-5 with a 1.99 ERA in 18 starts. He was drafted in the second round of the 2007 amateur draft by the Arizona Diamondbacks and signed by scout Hal Kurtzman.

Enright began his professional career in 2007, splitting the season between three teams - the Yakima Bears (five games), the South Bend Silver Hawks (one game) and the Visalia Oaks (four games). He did not allow a single earned run in 15 combined innings of work, and he struck out 17 batters. In 2008, he pitched for the Oaks, going 12-8 with a 4.44 ERA in 29 starts. With the Mobile Bay Bears in 2009, Enright went 10-9 with a 3.98 ERA in 27 starts and was a Southern League All-Star. He began 2010 with Mobile, going 4-1 with a 2.88 ERA in 14 starts prior to his call-up to the major leagues.

Enright was a winner in his major league debut. He gave up one earned run in 5 innings to the St. Louis Cardinals as the starter for the Diamondbacks on June 30¸ 2010 and was given credit for the D-Backs’ 4-2 win.

Enright was traded to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on July 23, 2012, in return for Frazier Hall.He made only three appearances for the Angels, with no record and a 14.73 ERA. He started 2013 in AAA but was called up to the big club on April 25th, taking the place of David Carpenter. He had to wait until April 29th to make his first appearance in a game, but it was a memorable one. He came on to pitch the bottom of the 18th inning of a game against the Oakland Athletics, with the score tied at 8-8, and the Angels having already used seven pitchers in the game. He got through the inning easily, striking out his opponent on the mound, Jerry Blevins, who mas making the first plate appearance of his major league career, in the process, but in the 19th, he walked Seth Smith to start the inning; Jed Lowrie forced out Smith at second and Barry struck out Yoenis Cespedes for the second out, but Brandon Moss then hit his second homer of the game, a walk-off shot that put an end to 6 hours and 32 minutes of baseball; it was the longest game by time in Angels history.

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