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Albert Pujols

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Jose Alberto Pujols
(Prince Albert, Phat Albert, The Machine, or El Hombre)

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[edit] Biographical Information

"The man is good at every little thing he does." - Mike Easler
"When that ball flew over our heads, I turned to Mike Mason, our bullpen coach, and said, 'That's why they pay that guy a hundred million bucks.' "— Ray King, watching in the bullpen when Albert Pujols hit a key post-season home run in 2005

Albert Pujols was quite possibly the best player of the 2000-2009 decade. Based on the similarity scores method, the most similar player to Pujols, at ages 21-27, was Joe DiMaggio. At ages 28-30, it was Jimmie Foxx. The second-most similar player to Pujols, in 2010, was Frank Robinson.

Pujols won the National League MVP award in 2005, 2008 and 2009, but that shouldn't obscure the fact that he was also in the top four in the MVP Award voting in each of 2001-2004 and 2006. He won the Rookie of the Year Award in 2001.

Born in the Dominican Republic, Pujols moved to the United States in the early 1990s. He briefly attended a Missouri community college and in 1999 was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 13th round. The scout was Dave Karaff.

The year 2000 was his only one in the minors. At age 20, he played most of the season for Peoria in the Class A Midwest League, posting a batting line of .324/.389/.565 with 17 home runs. He was the league's MVP. His teammate Ben Johnson hit 13 home runs, but with a much lower batting average. Pujols then spent 21 games with Potomac in the Carolina League and 3 games with Memphis in the Pacific Coast League to finish out 2000. He hit a walk-off home run to win the PCL Championship Series for Memphis.

His major league seasons from 2001-2009 were uniformly excellent. The lowest batting average he posted was .314, his lowest home run total was 32, and his lowest RBI total was 103. He even stole 16 bases in 18 attempts in 2005.

Pujols in August 2009

There is no way to know what the future will bring, but after his first nine years, Pujols had the fourth highest slugging percentage in the history of the game, behind Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, and Lou Gehrig, and ahead of Barry Bonds. Of course, those players did it over the course of a career, while Pujols still has many years to play.

If anything negative could be said about his play, it's that his range defensively early in his career could have been better. However, he is a multi-position player, having appeared in left field, right field, third base, and first base during his career, and even once apiece at shortstop in 2002 and second base in 2008. He switched largely to first base in 2004-2006, and won a Gold Glove at the position in 2006. In 2009, he set a record for assists by a first baseman.

2006 was a typical season offensively for Pujols, except his slugging was a bit better than usual. He played on the 2006 World Series-winning Cardinal team, and while he hit only .200, it was a low-hitting series, with the Cardinals as a team hitting .228 and the Detroit Tigers hitting .199. In 2006, Albert Pujols reached 2,000 career total bases in just 854 games, making him the quickest player ever to achieve that mark. The record had been 869 games by Nomar Garciaparra. He lost the 2006 NL MVP race to Ryan Howard, 388 points to 347. The Dominican Republic sports ministry arranged a news conference for Pujols, where he vented that a player from a non-playoff team should not win the MVP. It should be pointed out that Howard's team won two more games than Pujols' team and only missed the playoffs because they played in a tougher division.

Pujols hit his 300th home run on July 4, 2008. It made him the 5th-youngest player to hit 300 as he was 28 years and 170 days old, one day younger than Mel Ott. Alex Rodriguez, Jimmie Foxx, Ken Griffey Jr. and Andruw Jones had reached 300 at younger ages than Pujols.

In 2009, Pujols broke Bill Buckner's major league record of 184 assists by a first baseman. Mark Grace had held the NL mark. Even though he was not yet 30 years old at the end of 2009, he already ranked # 31 on the all-time list for points as determined by the Hall of Fame Monitor. The scale is such that 130 points "is a virtual cinch" to get into the Hall, while Pujols already had 226 points. That year, Pujols reached 100 RBI, just like his 8 prior seasons; that broke a tie with Ted Williams for the second-longest stretch to open a career. Only Al Simmons (11 years) had a longer run of 100-RBI seasons to begin a career.

Pujols hit his 400th career home run on August 26, 2010, off Jordan Zimmermann. He became the 47th major leaguer to reach that figure and the third-youngest after Alex Rodriguez and Ken Griffey Jr. In June 2011, Pujols hit game-winning, game-ending, extra-inning homers in consecutive games; no major leaguer had done that since Albert Belle in 1995 and no National Leaguer since Ron Santo in 1966. However, he finished the season with the worst offensive numbers of his career: a .299 batting average (his first time under .300), 37 homers and 99 RBI (his first time below 100). For all that, he was still one of the top offensive forces in the major leagues.

After struggling in the first two games of the 2011 World Series, Pujols set or tied four records in Game 3. He went deep 3 times, drove in six runs, had 5 hits and 14 total bases. He tied the home run record held by Babe Ruth and Reggie Jackson (Pablo Sandoval would join them in 2012), the RBI record held by Bobby Richardson and Hideki Matsui and the hit mark held by Paul Molitor. He set a new total bases record, breaking the record of 12 shared by Ruth and Jackson. He may not have done much the rest of the Series, but his one-game performance was of utmost importance in helping the Cardinals win a tightly-fought 7-game series over the Texas Rangers, giving him a second Championship ring.

Shortly after the 2011 World Series, Pujols became a free agent. The Cardinals wanted to retain his services, but they were far from the only serious suitors, and had to drop out of the bidding when they were reluctant to go over $200 million or 9 years. On December 8th, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim announced they had won the sweepstakes, signing Albert to a 10-year contract worth $254 million - the second largest contract of all time after Alex Rodriguez's extension signed after the 2008 season. The signing immediately led to speculation in Southern California that the Angels would dump various players or move them to other positions in order to accommodate Pujols' salary and need to play either DH or first base. It was in fact veteran OF Bobby Abreu who paid the price, being released before the end of April, 2012. However, it was not because Albert pushed him out, because his performance over his first few weeks in the American League was so poor as to become the talk of Major League Baseball. By May 5th, he was hitting only .194 and had yet to homer, and he was being booed at home while the Angels were struggling to a 10-17 record. After suffering back-to-back shutouts to the Toronto Blue Jays, manager Mike Scioscia took the rare decision of benching Pujols for that day's game. The message seemed to work as in his next game, on May 6th, Pujols finally hit his first AL homer, connecting off the Jays' Drew Hutchison with a man on in the 5th inning to send the Angels to a 4-3 win. By the end of July, he had raised his average to .284 and had hit 20 homers; not surprisingly, the Angels were back in the thick of the playoff race. On July 31st and August 1st, Albert had back-to-back two homer games against the Angels' main rivals, the Texas Rangers. The first day's output led to a 6-2 win, but in the second, the Rangers managed to storm back from a 10-7 deficit in the 10th inning to prevent Los Angeles from moving within 2 games of the AL West lead, and their momentum cooled off after that. On September 23rd, Albert collected his 100th and 101st RBI in a 4-1 win over the Chicago White Sox, hitting triple digits for the 11th time in 12 seasons in spite of his slow start. He finished the year at .285/.343/.516 with 30 homers and 105 RBI in 154 games, very respectable numbers given his slow start, but the Angels finished well out of the postseason picture.

After the 2012 season, Pujols underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right knee. He was hoping to play for the Dominican Republic in the 2013 World Baseball Classic, and was named on the team's initial roster, but had to withdraw on the advice of doctors, although he still hoped to be available for the later stages of the tournament, were the Dominican Republic national team still involved, but in the end the D.R. won the tournament without his contribution. He was having his poorest season in 2013 when he went down with a foot injury in late July. His batting average was only .258 after 99 games - his .285 the previous season had been his lowest batting average until then - and he had only hit 17 homers, although his total of 64 RBIs was still respectable. But the problems went deeper: at .330, his OBP was not only the lowest of his career but a full 80 points below his career average, as pitchers were increasingly willing to challenge him given his lack of results; his slugging percentage of .437 was also miles below his career norms. The injury was a torn plantar fascia and had bothered him in some form since the start of the season until he aggravated it running the bases on July 26th. When he was placed on the DL two days later, the Angels were glum about his chances of returning before the end of the season, and wondering whether his long-term contract was not already a huge white elephant. Indeed, on August 19th, the team confirmed that Pujols was done for the year.

When the 2014 season started, however, there was renewed interest in Pujols as he started the season with 492 homers, making his joining the 500 home run club in the early part of the year an almost foregone conclusion. In spite of the evidence of declining production ion his first two seasons as a member of the Angels, a number of writers singled him out in their pre-season picks as a potential of Comeback Player of the Year or MVP, on the basis that he was bound to drive in a ton of runs if he stayed healthy and hit between Mike Trout and Josh Hamilton all season. On April 22nd, he hit homers #499 and 500 in a game against the Washington Nationals to join the 500 Home Run Club as its 26th member. He was the first to hit #500 as his second homer of the game, and was the first new member of the fraternity since Gary Sheffield had joined in 2009. The day before the game, he had gone 0 for 5 but told reporters that he would hit the two homers required for the milestone the next day. He made good on his promise, connecting off Taylor Jordan in the 1st and again in the 5th to lead the Angels to a 7-2 win.

[edit] Notable Achievements

  • 2000 MVP Midwest League Peoria Chiefs
  • 2001 NL Rookie of the Year Award
  • 2001 Topps All-Star Rookie Team
  • 9-time NL All-Star (2001 & 2003-2010)
  • 3-time NL MVP (2005, 2008 & 2009)
  • 2004 NLCS MVP
  • 2-time NL Gold Glove Winner (2006/1B & 2010/1B)
  • 6-time NL Silver Slugger Award Winner (2001/3B, 2003/OF, 2004/1B & 2008-2010/1B)
  • NL Batting Average Leader (2003)
  • NL On-Base Percentage Leader (2009)
  • 3-time NL Slugging Percentage Leader (2006, 2008 & 2009)
  • 3-time NL OPS Leader (2006, 2008 & 2009)
  • 5-time NL Runs Scored Leader (2003-2005, 2009 & 2010)
  • NL Hits Leader (2003)
  • 4-time NL Total Bases Leader (2003, 2004, 2008 & 2009)
  • NL Doubles Leader (2003)
  • 2-time NL Home Runs Leader (2009 & 2010)
  • NL RBI Leader (2010)
  • 20-Home Run Seasons: 12 (2001-2012)
  • 30-Home Run Seasons: 12 (2001-2012)
  • 40-Home Run Seasons: 6 (2003-2006, 2009 & 2010)
  • 100 RBI Seasons: 11 (2001-2010 & 2012)
  • 100 Runs Scored Seasons: 10 (2001-2006 & 2008-2011)
  • 200 Hits Seasons: 1 (2003)
  • Won two World Series with the St. Louis Cardinals in 2006 and 2011


NL MVP
2004 2005 2006
Barry Bonds Albert Pujols Ryan Howard
2007 2008 2009
Jimmy Rollins Albert Pujols Albert Pujols
2008 2009 2010
Albert Pujols Albert Pujols Joey Votto


NL Rookie of the Year
2000 2001 2002
Rafael Furcal Albert Pujols Jason Jennings

[edit] Records Held

  • Most RBI by an NL rookie, 130, 2001
  • Most Extra Base Hits by a rookie, 83, 2001
  • Assists, first baseman, season, 185, 2009
  • Consecutive seasons of 30 or more home runs, from start of career, 12
  • Consecutive seasons of 30 home runs, 100 RBI and .300 batting average from start of career, 10
  • Most home runs in first 3 seasons, 114, 2001-03 (tied with Ralph Kiner)
  • Most home runs in first 9 seasons, 366, 2001-09
  • Most home runs in first 10 seasons, 408, 2001-10
  • Most home runs in first 11 seasons, 445, 2001-11

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