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1924 Negro World Series

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KansasCityMonarchs.jpg
HilldaleDaisies.jpg
Kansas City Monarchs Five games to Four, one tie Hilldale
(55-22, NNL) (47-23, ECL)

Contents

[edit] Overview

The 1924 Colored World Series was the first official championship series between two recognized Negro League championship teams. There had been late- and post-season series between Negro teams before, and there had been unofficial champions of Black Baseball crowned in previous years, but this was only the fifth season since the founding of the Negro National League and the second since the Eastern Colored League began play, and it was the first meeting between teams that were officially league champions in the same fashion as the white World Series. While the series was initially arranged by agreement between the teams, it gained the approval of both leagues. No Colored World Series had been scheduled in 1923, owing to unresolved conflicts between league presidents Rube Foster and Ed Bolden, but there was considerable pressure from the black media and from fans to hold a championship.

The series was a best-five-of-nine contest between the NNL champion Kansas City Monarchs and the ECL champion Hildales. In a ten-game series, the Monarchs narrowly defeated Hilldale 5 games to 4, with one tie game.

The Monarchs and Hilldale line up prior to Game 5.

[edit] The Teams

[edit] Kansas City Monarchs

[edit] Administration
[edit] Pitchers
Name GP Won Lost ERA G BA OBA SLG HR
Cliff Bell 8 4 1 2.93 8 .118 ~.118 .118 0
William Bell 17 10 2 3.79 22 .158 ~.158 .175 0
William "Plunk" Drake 26 11 8 3.89 27 .271 ~.295 .407 1
Bill McCall 3 2 0 3.24 3 .333 ~.333 .333 0
José Méndez 13 4 1 3.07 16 .217 ~.308 .435 1
Harold "Yellowhorse" Morris 18 6 4 4.02 19 .205 ~.279 .308 0
WIlber "Bullet" Rogan 23 16 5 3.63 50 .413 ~.458 .652 5
[edit] Catchers
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Frank Duncan C 70 247 66 0 37 6 .267 ~.358 .332
[edit] Infielders
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Newt Allen 2B 75 302 83 2 32 3 .275 ~.362 .348
Lem Hawkins 1B 63 272 76 0 27 2 .279 ~.340 .349
Newt Joseph 3B 73 279 101 4 60 2 .362 ~.406 .523
Walter "Dobie" Moore SS 77 309 111 5 53 3 .359 ~.404 .550
[edit] Outfielders
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Oscar "Heavy" Johnson LF 72 272 101 5 62 2 .371 ~.424 .548
Hurley McNair RF 72 275 97 8 55 3 .359 ~.407 .520
Carroll "Dink" Mothell CF 70 243 69 0 37 2 .284 ~.372 .387
George Sweatt OF 34 118 32 3 16 1 .271 ~.323 .424
George Sweatt was primarily an outfielder, but also played infield positions when called upon. Bullet Rogan was a true two-way player, taking a regular pitching turn and also playing all outfield positions. Rogan also pinch hit and played second base on occasion.

[edit] Hilldale

[edit] Adiministration
[edit] Pitchers
Name GP Won Lost ERA G BA OBA SLG HR
William "Zip" Campbell 1 0 0 6.00 1 .000 ~.000 .000 0
Phil Cockrell 16 10 1 3.97 21 .234 ~.265 .277 0
Rube Currie 11 1 6 5.43 12 .263 ~.300 .263 0
Hosley "Scrip" Lee 8 2 4 3.72 13 .353 ~.421 .353 0
Merven "Red" Ryan 26 14 7 3.08 28 .156 ~.188 .169 0
Jess "Nip" Winters 29 20 5 2.77 34 .291 ~.303 .415 0
[edit] Catchers
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Joe Lewis C 27 84 28 0 9 3 .333 ~.385 .488
Louis Santop C 49 181 62 5 29 4 .343 ~.374 .503
[edit] Infielders
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Tom Allen 1B 28 66 13 0 3 1 .197 ~.232 .258
George "Tank" Carr 1B 54 180 53 1 26 13 .294 ~.324 .428
Judy Johnson 3B 70 263 90 4 48 10 .342 ~.389 .510
Raleigh "Biz" Mackey SS 70 280 93 4 41 8 .332 ~.364 .462
Jake Stephens SS 28 104 19 1 6 4 .183 ~.227 .269
Frank Warfield 2B 70 272 85 2 36 22 .313 ~.355 .393
[edit] Outfielders
Name POS G AB H HR RBI SB BA OBA SLG
Otto Briggs RF 58 228 65 0 14 11 .285 ~.386 .355
George "Dibo" Johnson CF 64 224 56 3 28 4 .250 ~.320 .366
Clint Thomas LF 70 273 77 8 48 14 .282 ~.326 .476
Biz Mackey split his time mainly between short stop and first base, catching only a limited number of games, and led the team in games at short. Jake Stephens was considered better defensively, but Mackey was actually the starting short stop.
According to legend, manager Warfield shuffled his defensive lineup in response to Stephens broken ankle late in the season, moving Judy Johson from third to short, Mackey to third, and Santop to catcher as replacement for Mackey, but Mackey was already the starting shortstop and Santop the primary catcher, with Joe Lewis as his backup. The late-season defensive realignment was apparently for other reasons.

[edit] The Games

[edit] Game One

Friday, October 3 1924, at Baker Bowl in Philadelphia

Attendance: 5,366
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Kansas City 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 6 6 0
Hilldale 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 8 6
W: Bullet Rogan (1-0)  L: Phil Cockrell (0-1)
HRs: none
Umpires: McBride, Freeman, Coolan, and McDevitt
Rogan pitched an 8-hitter, holding Hilldale scoreless until two out in the ninth. Warfield’s bases-loaded error in the sixth allowed the Monarchs to score two, and aided by Cockrell’s three errors in the same inning, opened up a five-run inning for the Monarchs.
The first two games were played in the Philadelphia Phillies' Baker Bowl instead of Hilldale's home park to take advantage of the larger capacity.
In the top of the first inning plate umpire McBride, who regularly umpired in the IL, halted play and called a ball on Phill Cockrell when Cockrell threw a spitball to Lem Hawkins. The spitball had been banned in the white leagues since 1920, but was still a legal pitch in the Negro Leagues. After a brief conference between Ed Bolden, Rube Foster, and the umpires, the umpires agreed to allow the spitter throughout the games.
[edit] Game Two

Saturday, October 4 1924 at Baker Bowl in Philadelphia

Attendance: 8,661
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Kansas City 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2
Hilldale 5 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 - 11 15 2
W: Nip Winters (1-0)  L: Bill McCall (0-1)
HRs: none
Umpires: McDevitt, McBride, Freeman, and Doolan
Bill McCall could not get through the first inning, facing only three men and recording no outs before "Plunk" Drake came in to relieve. Drake did not fare much better, lasting only 1 2/3 innings himself. Hilldale led 9-0 by the end of the third.
Nip Winters shut out the normally high-scoring Monarchs on four singles.
[edit] Game Three

Sunday, October 5 1924 at Maryland Baseball Park in Baltimore

Attendance: 5,503
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 R H E
Kansas City 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 6 8 5
Hilldale 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 6 10 1
HRs: KC – Newt Joseph (1)
Umpires: Freeman, Dolan, McDevitt, and McBride
The Monarchs took a one-run lead into the bottom of the ninth and again into the bottom of the twelfth, but were unable to put Hilldale away. William Bell pitched 12 innings for no decision; he played the thirteenth inning in right field, as Rogan came in from center field to pitch the thirteenth inning. Monarch fielding errors in the fifth and ninth innings allowed Hilldale to stay in the game. Biz Mackey received three intentional walks during the game. The game was called on account of darkness after thirteen innings.
Before the game, NNL president Rube Foster and ECL president Ed Bolden formally shook hands, bringing the feud between their leagues to an official end.
This game was played at the home park of the Baltimore Black Sox on account of Pennsylvania's blue laws, which did not allow games on Sunday.
[edit] Game Four

Monday, October 6 1924 at Maryland Baseball Park in Baltimore

Attendance: 584
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Kansas City 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 4
Hilldale 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 4 1
W: Rube Currie (1-0)  L: Cliff Bell (0-1)
HRs: none
Umpires: Freeman, Dolan, McDevitt, and McBride

Following Sunday's tie game, another game was hastily scheduled for Monday. Before a sparse weekday crowd, former Monarch Rube Currie relieved Red Ryan with one out in the third and the Monarchs leading 3-0, and shut them out the rest of the game. Hilldale tied the game in the third on two base hits, a walk, and three steals, including Otto Briggs’ steal of home. Two walks and two errors helped score Hilldale’s winning run with none out in the ninth.

[edit] Game Five

Saturday, October 11 1924, Muehlebach Field, Kansas City

Attendance: 3,891
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Hilldale 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 5 10 1
Kansas City 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 4
W: Nip Winters (2-0)  L: Bullet Rogan (1-1)  
HRs: Hilldale – Judy Johnson
Umpires: McGrew, Anderson, Costello, and Goeckel
The game nearly had a late start, due do a high school football game at Muehlebach that ended only a half-hour before game time. Judy Johnson’s three-run inside-the-park home run with one out in the ninth shocked the crowd into silence and provided the difference in the game. A controversial umpire call and three defensive mishaps helped set the table for Johnson’s heroics. Until the fatal ninth, the game had been a classic pitchers duel between staff aces Winters and Rogan. Winters finished the game with a flourish, retiring 25 of the last 26 men he faced. Hilldale had taken a 3-1 lead in games.
[edit] Game Six

Sunday, October 12 1924 at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City

Attendance: 8,885
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Hilldale 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 11 0
Kansas City 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6 12 1
W: William Bell (1-0)  L: Scrip Lee (0-1)  
HRs: none
Umpires: Anderson, Costello, Goeckel, and McGrew
Phil Cockrell started the game for Hilldale despite a painful boil under his arm, and was driven from the mound in the first inning, allowing four runs. Scrip Lee pitched the remainder of the game, but tired in the eighth when the Monarchs scored the tie-breaking run on George Sweatt's triple.
[edit] Game Seven

Tuesday, October 14 1924 at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City

Attendance: 2,539
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Hilldale 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 7 1
Kansas City 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 11 1
W: José Méndez (1-0)  L: Nip Winters (1-1)  
HRs: none
Umpires: Costello, Goeckel, McGrew, and Anderson
Nip Winters pitched twelve innings and took the loss, while Méndez pitched brilliantly in relief to win and to knot the series at three games. Newt Joseph stole home in the fourth inning to start the Monarchs’ scoring. Bullet Rogan did not hit the ball out of the infield, but still managed to get three hits, score one run, and drive in the winning tally in the twelfth inning.
The game had actually been scheduled for October 13, but had to be postponed one day due to because of a benefit game for a local white hospital.


[edit] Game Eight

Saturday, October 18 1924 at Schorling's Park in Chicago

Attendance: 2,608
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Hilldale 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 9 1
Kansas City 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 9 0
W: Bullet Rogan (2-1)  L: Rube Currie (1-1)  
HRs: none
Umpires: Goeckel, Moore, McGrew, and Costello
In one of Negro League baseball’s legendary games, the Monarchs rallied for three runs in the ninth to stun Hilldale, winning their third straight game, and taking a 4-3 series lead. Warfield's defensive realignment, necessitated by Jake Stephens' ankle injury, came back came back to haunt him in the ninth inning of this game when Rogan beat out a hit to Mackey, who was playing deep and Moore singled off of Judy Johnson's glove. After Santop dropped Frank Duncan’s foul popup, Duncan singled through Mackey's legs, allowing the tying and winning runs to score.
Also legendary was Frank Warfield's bitter post-game verbal assault against Santop. Even though Mackey and Johnson had contributed their own misplays to the defensive meltdown (and Mackey had failed twice in key defensive situations), Warfield attacked Santop following the loss, laying blame squarely at Santop's feet. Santop was reportedly reduced to tears by the tirade, and it is said that he never recovered from the humiliation.
[edit] Game Nine

Sunday, October 19 1924 at Schorling's Park in Chicago

Attendance: 6,271
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Hilldale 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 5 13 4
Kansas City 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 8 5
W: Nip Winters (3-1)  L: "Plunk" Drake (0-1)  
HRs: none
Umpires: McGrew, Costello, Goeckel, and Moore
Starting and completing his fourth game of the series, Nip Winters won for the third time to tie the series. William Bell started for Kansas City, but was shelled with none out in the fifth inning when Hilldale tied the score 2-2. Drake pitched creditably until tiring in the ninth, when Hilldale scored two to win. The Series was now tied for the third time. Despite having harangued Santop for his defensive lapse the day before, Warfield started Santop at catcher again. Santop played errorless ball and made two hits in the game.


[edit] Game Ten

Monday, October 20 1924 at Schorling's Park in Chicago

Attendance: 1,549
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Hilldale 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Kansas City 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 6 0
W: José Méndez (2-0)  L: Scrip Lee (0-2)  
HRs: none
Umpires: Costello, Goeckel, Moore, and Conlin
The teams met in the final game before a small crowd, attributed to inclement weather in Chicago that day. Although still weak from surgery before the series and advised by a doctor not to exert himself, Méndez had already pitched 10 innings of relief in the first nine games, but decided to start the final game himself. Foster agreed with the strategy, and Game Ten became part of Méndez's legend.
Méndez matched Hilldale starter Scrip Lee zero for zero for seven full innings until Lee tired in the bottom of the eighth. Lee changed from his normal submarine delivery to an overhand style in that inning, and the Monarchs scored five runs off of him, including one by Méndez himself. When Hilldale went out in the ninth, the Monarchs had won the first Colored World Series

[edit] Notes of the Series

  • Rube Foster had originally scheduled games Five, Six, and Seven for his own ballpark, but Kansas City ownership and fans strenuously objected to losing such lucrative dates, and Foster relented, scheduling the last three games for Chicago.
  • Despite the fact that both leagues employed African-American umpires during the regular season, both teams agreed to hire umpires from Organized Ball (primarily from the AA and IL), to avoid any possibility of favoritism charges being made.
  • Ticket prices for the series were set at $1.00 for general admission and $1.65 for box seats. Typical in-season prices were 35 and 85 cents, respectively.
  • There was no choice of a Most Valuable Player, but author and researcher Larry Lester chose Nip Winters as MVP for his 3-1 record (the only loss coming in a 12-inning game), 21 strikeouts, and 1.16 ERA. He also gave consideration to Bullet Rogan (2-1 WL, 2.57 ERA, and a .325 BA), Judy Johnson (.365 BA and 7 RBI), and José Méndez (2-0, 1.42).
  • Net profits were $23,463.44 and were split as follows: 10 per cent ($2,346.34) went to the National Commission (split evenly between each league); 42 per cent ($9,854.64) to the winning Monarchs (half to the ownership and 16 player shares of $307.96 each); 28 per cent ($6,569.76) to the losing Hilldale club (half to the ownership and 17 player shares of $193.22 each); 12 per cent ($2,815.62) split evenly between the American Giants and Black Sox, who finished second in their respective leagues; and 8 per cent ($1,877.08) split between each of the third-place teams, Detroit and the Lincoln Giants.

[edit] Sources

[edit] Books
[edit] Newspapers
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