Comments on: Most hits, homers, strikeouts, etc, first 10 seasons: Ichiro, Pujols, and Dunn http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: David Blocher http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-75399 Fri, 03 Dec 2010 17:40:49 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-75399 The spike in HR in the 1950's appears to be mostly integration but also the rise of relief pitching which began in the late 1950's. Through most of the 1950's pitchers interchanged as starters and relievers, even those like Joe Black and Clem Labine. The '54 Giants had Wilhelm and Marv Grissom, but it was about 1959 or 1960 that Chicago newspaperman Jerome Holtzman came up with the "save" statistic. The good starters still went late into games and the era of the seven-inning starter really didn't take hold until the late 1960's, so that may have contributed to hefty home run totals.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-75071 Thu, 02 Dec 2010 05:58:26 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-75071 @17, Artie Z -- "was/is Sportsman's Park and Fenway Park 'doubles havens'?"

Fenway undoubtedly is one of the greatest doubles parks in MLB history. Look at any year's home/road batting & pitching splits for Boston: In 2010, there were 86 more doubles in BoSox home games; in 1980, 100 more; in 1950, 112 more; in 1920, 48 more. (For some reason, this seems to benefit visiting hitters more than the Sox themselves. In 1950, Red Sox pitchers allowed just 74 doubles on the road, but 134 at home.)

Other ways to measure this:
-- Per 600 PAs, Wade Boggs averaged 46 doubles in Fenway, 25 everywhere else. Williams hit 61% of his doubles at home; Yaz hit 59% at home. In his 67-double season, Earl Webb hit 39 at home (58%).
-- From 1990-2010, there were 321 qualifying player-seasons in which over 1/4 of their hits were doubles; 31 of those were by Red Sox, roughly triple their "fair share". The Yankees had just 6.

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By: kds http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74622 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 16:47:38 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74622 Note his age for Earl Averill's first 10 years. And he didn't have to cross the Pacific Ocean. He did not even play in the minors before age 22.

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By: kds http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74615 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 16:30:45 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74615 Babe Ruth leads in secondary average with .594? Have you forgotten Barry Bonds? > 2500 BB. > 500 SB. > 3000 extra bases on hits. .600. (Actually .621, I was going to leave it as an exercise for the student.) In 2004, with the ridiculous 232 BB he had 406 secondary bases in 373 AB. Giving a secondary average of 406/373 = 1.088.

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By: Tmckelv http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74592 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 14:59:57 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74592 I knew Earl Averil was a HOFer, but I definitely would never have expected him to be represented on many of these lists (XBH and TB especially).

Other surprises on the lists were Gilliam (PA) and Dunn (#4 HR).

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By: Mike Felber http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74574 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 08:27:45 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74574 Williams walked a lot more than Pujols, just about 50 % more over a career. That & to a lesser extent the 80 less games afforded by a shorter season really add up. That + what is mentioned in post #59 would give Ted the XBH lead. You do not need ton go as far as his excellent K rate, much better GIDP: look at the OPS +, weighted would be even better, & the least we can say is that though Pujols is definitely an amazing hitter, Williams was clearly absolutely better (at least relative to his time, if you believe the quality of play/pitching has improved a lot. Which it likely has).

And look at his offensive WAR #s for the 2 years before & after the war. They are his best, & enormous: 10.3, 11.6, 11.2, 10.3. It is likely that he would have been able to maintain about this average for the 3 years in between. He may have only been very good at hitting, but given its importance, & how great he was at it, he is amongst the best ever.

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By: DavidRF http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74554 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 05:53:58 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74554 Pujols leads Williams by 99 XBH. That's a huge gap to overcome. I don't see it. 1949 was one of Williams' best seasons. You don't gain anything replacing that. He did break his elbow in 1950 and had an "off year" (OPS+ = 162) in 1951, but I don't think you can extrapolate more than 40-50 more XBH out of that.

Williams walked a bit more than Pujols so he loses some oppurtunities there. But you also have to give Pujols credit. He matches Williams in ISO for this time period which is pretty incredible.

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By: Paul-SF http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74551 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 05:23:13 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74551 Would Pujols still have the XBH lead if you replace Williams' 1948-51 seasons with an estimate of his 1941-45 war years (probably best done by averaging 1940-41, 46-47)?

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By: Evan http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74549 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 05:06:04 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74549 Duke @56,

I phrased that poorly and ambiguously. The story I remember reading was that McGwire insisted upon Pujols being included on the roster. It makes McGwire look good in retrospect in the sense that he had the ability to recognize the superior hitting ability of Pujols, but I'm not sure that McGwire would be in a position to make that type of demand.

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By: dukeofflattbush http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/9292/comment-page-1#comment-74547 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 04:50:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=9292#comment-74547 Evan,
DDo you mean McGwire wanted the spotlight for himself or that he believed the young Pujols deserved more fine tuning in AAA?

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