Comments on: Hitting 6 HR In A 9-Inning Loss http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53183 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 19:45:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53183 I see that 8 of the most recent 11 were AL games in the DH era. Two of the others were interleague games, and in both cases, it was the AL team that lost with 6 HRs, but both were in the NL park with no DH.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53179 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 19:33:32 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53179 @25
Mike -- No, alas, the Spiders hat lives only in my imagination. I just like to drop the name whenever it's remotely fitting. Ever since I learned about their 1899 season, they have given me consolation when things are going badly for my Metsies.

@26
Steven -- Good point; I would have loved to find Boom-Boom Beck, Ducky Medwick, or other illustrious nicknames involved in those games. But here's an amusing snippet from Boom-Boom's B-R Bullpen page, with a tie-in to the Hack-man:

"From Baseball Library: Boom-Boom Beck supposedly earned his nickname while pitching for Casey Stengel's Dodgers in 1934. Becoming upset during a July 4th game when Stengel came out to remove him when the Dodgers still had a lead, Beck angrily threw the ball into right field at the old Baker Bowl in Philadelphia, PA. The ball hit the tin-plated wall and caromed to center. The "boom-boom" of the rebound roused hung-over centerfielder Hack Wilson, who was daydreaming during the pitching change and thought the game had resumed. Wilson pursued the ball and fired a strike back to the infield."

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By: steven http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53063 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 08:22:46 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53063 #16: Sloppy, Fat Freddie and Hack...Too bad Clyde Beck wasn't "Boom-Boom" Beck, or you would have hit a Grand Slam of great nicknames in your post.

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By: Mike Felber http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53058 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 08:01:00 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53058 John Austin, do you actually have a Cleveland Spiders hat? That seems great, I would not ind one of those. We used to tease my Dad about the hapless Cleveland teams-he was from there-& imagine the delight when I found that in '99 they lost more teams than any Professional team ever! The year, & name, is just cool too.

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By: Pat http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53045 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 06:57:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53045 Note the July 10, 1999 game on this list...the last time this happened to the Yankees. A few interesting things:

1) It was a pivotal game for 27-year-old Jorge Posada, who hit 2 HR and raised his batting average five points from .199 coming in. Beginning with this game, Posada hit .293 in the second half of the 1999 season, making a convincing argument for the Yankees to install him as the full-time catcher in 2000 and beyond.

2) This is actually a "Mets Classic," as seen frequently on SNY -- a memorable FOX Saturday Game of the Week which the Mets won on pinch-hitter Matt Franco's walkoff two-run single off Mariano Rivera in the ninth.

3) Sixteen years into his career, this remains the only game Derek Jeter ever started as a cleanup hitter. Joe Torre (Buck and McCarver made a lot out of this during the game, IIRC) flipped Jeter and Bernie Williams from their usual spots as an experiment. After Jeter's 0-for-4, it never happened again. He has not batted lower than fourth in the Yankees' order since September 27, 1997.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53040 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 06:26:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53040 John (16), on 23 September 1890, George Nicol of the American Association St Louis Browns pitched a 7-inning no-hitter against the Philadelphia Athletics; the Browns won, 21-2. I don't know how many hits they got (but I imagine it was quite a few...).

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53037 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 06:18:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53037 Dkp (17 and 20), the canonical example is the 1960 World Series.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-53034 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 06:00:22 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-53034 P.S. Sloppy Thurston shares the live-ball record of 6 HRs allowed in a win, along with Larry Benton (game #18 on the original list) and Tim Wakefield (game #3 on the list).

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By: dkp http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-52945 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 02:28:23 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-52945 Steve,
How can I find post season series outcomes based on head to head totals from that series? Ie Team A lost the series despite having more HR's or hits whatever?

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By: Tom http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/8392/comment-page-1#comment-52944 Sun, 26 Sep 2010 02:27:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=8392#comment-52944 It's funny that the all the teams lost....lol

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