Comments on: 2010 RE24/boLI Leaders http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Derek http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35508 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 16:59:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35508 As a Phillies fan who watches them everyday, I'm shocked to see Werth higher than Howard. While Werth started hot and has been producing lately, he also had a major slump, including a 100+ AB homerless streak. Howard meanwhile has been producing consistently all year. Also nice to see Chase up there even though he's missed so much time. He's got the 4th fewest games played on this list. That should help explain why we miss him so much (in case you didn't already know.

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By: Basmati http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35506 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 16:49:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35506 No Angels on the list - probably explains a few things.

Also I see Jason Heyward 16th in his rookie year - pretty impressive.

Guys like Huff and Rolen stand out as well. Wouldn't generally consider Huff that high up a list like this, and Rolen maybe once upon a time but not any more.

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By: Steve Lombardi http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35496 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 13:44:39 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35496 Michael - if it helps, this is what's listed on http://www.baseball-reference.com/about/wpa.shtml -

Leverage Index - Within a season, there are plays that are more pivotal than others. We attempt to quantify these plays with a stat called leverage index (LI). LI looks at the possible changes in win probability in a give situation and situations where dramatic swings in win probability are possible (runner on second late in a tie game) have higher LI's than situations where there can be no large change in win probability (late innings of a 12-run blowout).

The stat is normalized so that on average the leverage is 1.00. In tense situations, the leverage is higher than 1.00 (up to about 10) and in low-tension situations the leverage is between 0 and 1.0.

WPA Win Probability Added. Sum of the differences in win expectancies for each play the player is credited with. Can be for a play, game, season, or career. This is denoted in wins and is of a similar scale to other wins-based statistics. It is highly dependent on the context in which a player played. Elite relievers (due to their high stress innings) may have as many WPA as starters which does not occur for stats like pitching linear weights. Note that it is relative to average, so a 0 WPA player is an average player.

WPA/LI Situational Wins. Sum of each plays WPA divided by the play's leverage index. SUM(WPA/LI) for all plays. This is similarly scaled to WPA, but removes the context from the outcome, so for this stat a player with 30 home runs all in blowouts would look very similar to a batter with 30 home runs all in tie games. They would look much different in WPA. Generally used for a season or career.

RE24 Runs Added by 24 base-out situations. Sum of the differences in run expectancies for each play the player is credited with. Can be for a play, game, season, or career. This is denoted in runs and is of a similar scale to other runs-based statistics like linear weights. It is somewhat highly dependent on the context in which a player played. A player with a lot of runners on base ahead of him has more of a chance to create RE24 than a batter who always comes up with the bases empty. It is relative to average, so unlike runs created an average player will have zero RE24.

boLI base-out leverage index. The average base-out leverage index for the 24 base-out situations the player batted or pitched in.

RE24/boLI Situational Runs above average for 24 base-out situations. Like WPA/LI, we SUM(RE24/boLI) for each of the plays the player was responsible for.

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By: Detroit Michael http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35495 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 13:25:47 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35495 So isn't this the same statistic as WPA/LI? Why try to create a different name?

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By: Detroit Michael http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35494 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 13:25:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35494 Aubrey Huff didn't seem underrated when the Tigers traded for him last year. A better description might be inconsistent, both on a year-to-year and sometimes on a month-to-month basis.

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By: Max http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35492 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 13:05:47 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35492 Aubrey Huff is up there, he is extremely underrated. Check out http://www.thefantasybaseballguru.com leave comments ask qs and follow me on Twitter at beatboston1995

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35458 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 04:03:28 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35458 I don't think 42nd is too high up. I mean, 42nd in HR is a bunch of guys tied with 16. But Tex has been his normal self since the first few weeks.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35449 Mon, 02 Aug 2010 01:24:52 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35449 The Rangers are the only team with 4 in the top 50. Several teams have three.

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By: TheGoof http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7661/comment-page-1#comment-35444 Sun, 01 Aug 2010 23:22:13 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7661#comment-35444 Fascinating that Teixeira, who everyone was panning not long ago as being a hole in the lineup, is so high up there. And look at Carlos Pena, despite the low OPS.

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