Comments on: Bloops: Cliff Lee’s amazing streak of IP and walks http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: dukeofflatbush http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-35326 Sat, 31 Jul 2010 15:16:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-35326 In Lee's 4 Ls & 4 ND, he has averaged 8+ IP and a 2.49 ERA

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By: Rich http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-35292 Sat, 31 Jul 2010 08:52:33 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-35292 @ 8

It was certainly less impressive for a pitcher to have very few walks in the 1880s given that a walk took as many as 7 pitches at one time.

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By: Basmati http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34832 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 18:06:59 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34832 @10 I wouldn't say this is a complete aberration. If you look at Lee's stats he has been improving both his BB/9 and SO/9 the last 3-4 years, and therefore by definition he has improved his SO/BB markedly but consistently.

Since 2006 Lee has improved his SO/9 from 5.8 to 6.1 to 6.9 to 7.0 to 7.4.
Since 2008 he's improved his BB/9 from 1.4 to 1.7 (1.1 after moving to PHI) to 0.5.

It goes without saying that if you improve your SO/9 and BB/9 you improve your SO/BB significantly.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34820 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 16:35:21 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34820 Josh (#4) -- The main reason that all the top K/BB seasons have occurred since 1994 (excluding the 19th century) is that the overall K rate has been climbing steadily for about 30 years. Individual records usually occur in a conducive environment. The MLB average in 1992 was 5.6 K/9 IP. By 1994, it was 6.2; it was 6.5 in '96; and by last year it was up to 7.0 K/9 -- roughly a 25% increase over the past 30 years or so. I'm pretty sure that MLB K rates and K/BB ratios have never been higher than they are right now; even in the low-scoring '60s, the overall K rate never topped 6.0 K/9, and the highest K/BB ratio was 2.09. This year's MLB K/BB ratio is 2.11. Just for the sake of context, the other end of the spectrum is represented by the years 1947-50, when walk rates were at historic levels and the K/BB ratio was less than 1 every year; many of the worst individual K/BB ratios were set during this brief period.

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By: dukeofflatbush http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34813 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 16:05:31 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34813 I didn't have time to read the whole thread, but if noone has mentioned it, brett (bleach water gun) saberhaegen is the only pitcher with W>BB

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By: BSK http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34788 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 13:26:40 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34788 The weirder thing is how much of an aberration this is for Lee. His highest K/BB was 7.5 last year and in most other years was nothing particularly outstanding. This year he apparently turned into SuperMan.

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By: Neil Paine http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34773 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 09:31:19 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34773 Yes, the list I posted was in the expansion era, 1961-2010. A lot of guys put up crazy numbers in bygone eras, but I was focusing on how remarkable Lee's performance has been for a modern pitcher.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34744 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 03:47:51 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34744 #4, not so - several of the top-10 seasons were in the 1880s, see http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/strikeouts_per_base_on_balls_season.shtml

People often discuss records that will never be broken. It's rarer to discuss records that stood for a long time, but eventually were broken. Grasshopper Jim Whitney's record of 10 strikeouts per walk, set in 1884, lasted 110 years. During those years, the closest anyone came was Ferguson Jenkins, 7.1 in 1971, only the 18th best all-time (not counting the as-yet-uncompleted 2010 season).

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By: Rioraton http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34742 Fri, 30 Jul 2010 03:14:11 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34742 As a lifelong Cubs fan, I need to point out that in 1974 Fergie also has a six game streak with the same numbers (and had three games either side of that streak with at least 8 IP and 1 or 2 walks). Of course, he did this for the Rangers...

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By: Phil http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7621/comment-page-1#comment-34713 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 22:31:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7621#comment-34713 Lee's performance this year has been truly unreal and I don't think enough is being made of it.

He leads major league starters in:

1. Average innings per start
2. Pitches per inning
3. K/BB
4. WHIP
5. OBA

And he leads the AL in ERA / ERA +

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