Comments on: Starting pitcher goes 9+ innings without getting credited for a complete game http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28463 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 23:24:03 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28463 As for the "You'll NEVER guess who did it twice" remark, the guy who did do it twice has the same name as another major league pitcher from not too long ago. If you hadn't mentioned that someone did it twice, I might have thought it was one for each of them.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28446 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 20:29:05 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28446 Greg Maddux is a classic case of a pitcher throwing too many pitches early in his career and getting burned out early. When are managers going to learn?

(a joke...yes...a joke...)

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By: David http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28445 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 20:21:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28445 John Tudor in 1985:

April and May: 1-7, 3.74 ERA, 65 IP, 1 CG
June-September: 20-1, 1.37 ERA, 210 IP, 10 SHO, 13 CG

No pitcher has ever thrown 10 shutouts in a season since then, and Tudor did it during the final four months of the 1985 season. 210 IP's in a four month stretch in just insane too.

If you include the 1985 postseason, he tossed a total of 305.2 IP in 1985.

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By: David http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28443 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 20:09:50 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28443 Greg Maddux did throw 10+ innings in consecutive starts in 1988, but one of them was a 10 inning shutout. So it doesn't count. In the other start he went 10.2 innings and threw 167 pitches. Had Maddux not been so overused early that season, he would have contended for a Cy Young Award that season (he should have easily been runner up to Hershiser). As late as July 15th, Maddux had a 15-3 record and a 2.13 ERA. During the final 2 and half months of the 1988 season, Maddux went just 3-5 with a 5.28 ERA because of his tired arm.

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By: Sean Forman http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28434 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 18:12:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28434 They are TBD because they were first the TB Devil Rays and I did not want to go back and retroactively change their team ID when they changed their name. It would have hurt our SEO and broken some links, etc.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28416 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 16:07:54 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28416 Kelly, I don't know the answer but I agree that there do seem to be discrepancies. If you're really curious, I would suggest you submit the question on the feedback form here.

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By: Kelly http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28414 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 16:04:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28414 Dumb question maybe (and certainly off-topic), but why is the 2002 Tampa Bay team abbreviated as "TBD" and not "TBR"? The "Rays" are the same franchise, playing in the same city, only under a new team name. If we're going to track teams' name changes, then shouldn't Jack Chesbro be reported as having won 41 games in 1904 for "NYH", and not "NYY". Why are these two treated differently? There may be other examples although I can't think of any off the top of my head. It only matters (to the extent it matters at all) for the teams that have their nickname as part of their three letter abbreviation, namely the Rays, Yankees, Royals, Angels, White Sox, Mets, Cubs, Dodgers, Padres and Giants.

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By: Adam http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28412 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 15:55:20 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28412 Gotta love Tudor's 1985. 21 Wins, 1.93 ERA, 10 shutouts, 275 IP, .938 whip and no one in their right mind thought he was anywhere close to getting the Cy Young that year. He could of had that season any other year in the decade and won the Cy Young easily.

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By: Anon http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28408 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 15:17:12 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28408 Oh, Pedro DID get the win in that one - my mistake.

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By: Anon http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/7060/comment-page-1#comment-28407 Fri, 02 Jul 2010 15:15:29 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=7060#comment-28407 UNfortunately the list of guys who went more than 9 doesn't account for someone who started the 10th but retired no batters, most notably Pedro's near perfect game in 1995 when he was perfect through 9 and gave up a leadoff double in the 10th and was immediately yanked.

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