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Ubaldo Jimenez, Jaime Garcia, and fewer earned runs than starts

Posted by Andy on May 27, 2010

Here are the only pitchers in 2010 to start at least as many games as the total number of earned runs they've allowed:

Rk Player Year ER GS Age Tm Lg G CG SHO GF W L W-L% IP H BB SO ERA ERA+ AB BA OBP SLG OPS
1 Jeff Francis 2010 1 2 29 COL NL 2 0 0 0 1 0 1.000 13.1 12 4 9 0.68 688 46 .261 .314 .326 .640
2 Jaime Garcia 2010 7 9 23 STL NL 9 0 0 0 4 2 .667 55.1 39 24 45 1.14 360 198 .197 .286 .247 .533
3 J.A. Happ 2010 0 2 27 PHI NL 2 0 0 0 1 0 1.000 10.1 9 8 5 0.00 38 .237 .370 .289 .659
4 Ubaldo Jimenez 2010 7 10 26 COL NL 10 1 1 0 9 1 .900 71.1 42 24 61 0.88 515 238 .176 .260 .239 .500
5 Chris Young 2010 0 1 31 SDP NL 1 0 0 0 1 0 1.000 6.0 1 3 5 0.00 20 .050 .174 .050 .224
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 5/27/2010.

Francis, Happ, and Young have all had limited appearances in major-league games so far this year, but Garcia and Jimenez are kicking some serious rosin bag so far.

To give you an idea of how rare this is, check out the all-time leaders for full seasons with ER <= GS, ranked by most starts:

Rk Player GS ER Year Age Tm Lg G CG SHO W L W-L% IP ERA ERA+
1 Dutch Leonard 25 24 1914 22 BOS AL 36 17 7 19 5 .792 224.2 0.96 279
2 Ubaldo Jimenez 10 7 2010 26 COL NL 10 1 1 9 1 .900 71.1 0.88 515
3 Jaime Garcia 9 7 2010 23 STL NL 9 0 0 4 2 .667 55.1 1.14 360
4 Cisco Carlos 7 4 1967 26 CHW AL 8 1 1 2 0 1.000 41.2 0.86 352
5 Earl Hamilton 6 5 1918 26 PIT NL 6 6 1 6 0 1.000 54.0 0.83 348
6 Nick Maddox 6 5 1907 20 PIT NL 6 6 1 5 1 .833 54.0 0.83 296
7 Buck O'Brien 5 2 1911 29 BOS AL 6 5 2 5 1 .833 47.2 0.38 875
8 George McQuillan 5 3 1907 22 PHI NL 6 5 3 4 0 1.000 41.0 0.66 372
9 Bill Harris 4 3 1931 31 PIT NL 4 3 1 2 2 .500 31.0 0.87 449
10 Carlos Hernandez 3 2 2001 21 HOU NL 3 0 0 1 0 1.000 17.2 1.02 462
11 Pascual Perez 3 2 1990 33 NYY AL 3 0 0 1 2 .333 14.0 1.29 319
12 Bob Milacki 3 2 1988 23 BAL AL 3 1 1 2 0 1.000 25.0 0.72 550
13 Mike Norris 3 0 1975 20 OAK AL 4 1 1 1 0 1.000 16.2 0.00
14 Bruce Howard 3 2 1964 21 CHW AL 3 1 1 2 1 .667 22.1 0.81 436
15 Foster Edwards 3 2 1926 22 BSN NL 3 1 0 2 0 1.000 25.0 0.72 502
16 Earl Moore 3 0 1908 30 PHI NL 3 3 1 2 1 .667 26.0 0.00
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 5/27/2010.

If Jimenez and Garcia (unfortunately) did not pitch any more this year they'd rank second and third all-time. Of course, it's likely that they'll continue to pitch, give up a few more runs, and no longer quality for this list. Dutch Leonard is safe--probably for all eternity.

I talked about that Cisco Carlos season one on of the first Card of the Week posts a ways back.

(Note to reader KahunaTuna: I mis-spelled "Jimenez" when I wrote this post but thanks to you caught my own mistake this time!)

This entry was posted on Thursday, May 27th, 2010 at 11:29 am and is filed under Season Finders. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

9 Responses to “Ubaldo Jimenez, Jaime Garcia, and fewer earned runs than starts”

  1. Garcia has been a wonderful surprise for Cardinal fans, including those of us like me who were stumping for him early on in camp.

    It's a shame that his offense can't do more for him right now.

  2. Pitchers Hit Eighth--what a great name for a Cardinals/LaRussa fan!

  3. Looking at these nubers, I wonder how long it will be before Bob Gibson's 1968 totals are eclipsed {I am also assuing that it will take a freak performance for anyone to touch Leonard's mark. It will happen, mind you; but it will be one of those "Once in a Lifetime" events.

    P.S. -- Contrary to popular opinion, I was NOT there to see Dutch do his thing.

  4. Johnny Twisto Says:

    I've never understood why Dutch Leonard's record is almost completely forgotten. Everyone knows about Gibson '68 and I think most people believe that is the ERA record. I mean, people should be excited by a full-season ERA below 1.00. (Of course, Leonard did not pitch that many IP by the standards of his day, and the league may have been a bit diluted due to the Federal League, but those types of circumstances exist for almost any record.)

    (Technically, the real ERA record is Tim Keefe's 0.86 in 1880, but since I think he was pitching underhand from 50 feet away, it's hardly the same game.)

    (And it is worth remembering Gibson as the post-1920 record-holder, though it doesn't seem it was any easier to hit in 1968 than 1914, live ball or not.)

    (Enough parens.)

  5. [...] See the article here: Baseball-Referen&#99&#101&#32Blog » Blog Archive » Ubaldo Jimenez, Jaime … [...]

  6. Johnny Twisto, I'm glad you mentioned Tim Keefe's 1880. 12 starts and 10 earned runs should earn him a place on the list above, but evidently "all-time" means "since 1901." And what happened to Mordecai Brown, 1906? 32 starts and 32 earned runs, he should be on top of the table! OK, I get it, the body of the post says, "at least as many games as the total number of earned runs they've allowed," but the title says, "fewer earned runs than starts." Brown qualifies under the former, but not under the latter.

  7. Yeah I was a little sloppy there. I searched since 1901 because there were so many statistically odd seasons for pitchers before 1901 due to the reasons JT cited. I find it like searching for saves from the period before saves were a real stat. If managers didn't even know what a save was, are save numbers from that period meaningful at all?

  8. Andy, the reasons JT cited - pitching underhand, and pitching from 50 feet away - were gone in 1893. If you're going to draw a line between two kinds of baseball, I think 1893 is a better place to draw it than 1901.

    I won't be drawn on saves, but I think starts and earned runs were real stats in 1880, and meant pretty much the same thing then that they mean now. It's true that ERA was not an official stat in 1880 - but it wasn't an official stat in 1914, either, so there goes Dutch Leonard.

  9. Johnny Twisto Says:

    Wow, I actually didn't realize Keefe pitched so little in his record season. He was clearly the secondary pitcher on that team (Troy), as Mickey Welch started 64 games. In an 8-team league, he was 15th in IP, with less than 1/6 as many IP as the league leader. He did qualify for the ERA title by modern standards, but that is another questionable record. I'd guess any contemporary observers would find hilarious the notion that Keefe's season was particularly memorable.

    A few years later, of course, Keefe and Welch would team up for the Giants as one of the great 1-2 pitching combos in history, with a more equitable distribution of work.