Comments on: Highest WAR to End a Career http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Spartan Bill http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21697 Thu, 27 May 2010 04:20:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21697 John

From my personal observations at the time, I think you are mistaken about Mantle. I was a kid who grew up in the NY area, and followed baseball on a daily basis. Mantle played the 1968 season on the knees of a 70 year old man. There was no such thing as minor knee surgery in those days, let alone arthroscopic.

He was a 5 tool with only 2 tools left in the box, e was no longer fast, nor did he ever really master 1B. I don't know about his arm, but as a 1B, it didn't really matter. I saw him at a game about 2 or 3 years after he retired, and he walked like he was an ex-running back, not an ex-centerfielder.

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By: Charles Saeger http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21620 Wed, 26 May 2010 16:46:54 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21620 Same story with Johnny Dickshot as well. What a last name.

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By: Charles Saeger http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21616 Wed, 26 May 2010 16:42:28 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21616 Cuccinello's last year was right before the real ballplayers got back from the war. You want to knock his WAR by about a half-win to make up for the poor competition.

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By: John Q http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21568 Wed, 26 May 2010 10:07:59 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21568 Gerry,

You bring up a very good point about Mantle. One of the great misconceptions in baseball history was that Mantle was done as a ballplayer in 1968, when in reality he was just a victim of one of the worst run scoring environments in baseball history. It's a shame he didn't stay for 1969 because his average would have probably gone up about .40 points and everybody would have said what a great comeback and he probably could have played until 1971 or 1972.

Jackie Robinson retired because he got traded to the rival Giants after 1956, which is inconceivable in today's baseball. I still don't know why the Dodgers traded him in the first place.

Will Clark's retirement always seemed odd to me. He seem to come off as a fickle guy so who knows.

Whatever you think of him, Barry Bonds' 2007 retirement looks like he was black-listed in 2008. Especially when teams like Mets were playing back-up utility infielders as their left-right outfielders while struggling to stay in the play-off race.

Greenberg's retirement always sounded odd as well. He was traded to the Pirates and they moved the fences in for him and then he retired after only one year. Ralph Kiner was the big beneficiary for that move.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21546 Wed, 26 May 2010 06:06:31 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21546 At the time, people thought Mantle was playing to the bitter end. There was no recognition then of how good his 1968 was. All people could do was compare his triple crown stats to the ones he put up in 1961 and 1956, and it looked like it was past time for him to quit.

Cullenbine was before my time, but I bet no one appreciated how good his 1947 was, either. Hard to look past that .224 batting average.

Number 15, Frank Huelsman, had a bizarre season the year before he finished; in 1904, he played for the White Sox, the Tigers, back to the White Sox, then the Browns and the Senators. I believe he's the only ballplayer to switch teams 4 times in one season.

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By: Patrick http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21545 Wed, 26 May 2010 06:03:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21545 Beltran hasn't retired....

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By: Raphy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21534 Wed, 26 May 2010 03:37:41 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21534 Levi - Thanks. I don't know how I missed him.
John - Yes. Thanks for catching that.

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By: John Proulx http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21532 Wed, 26 May 2010 03:34:25 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21532 Clarification: JIM Doyle is the one whose career was cut short. LARRY Doyle has his own interesting story.

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By: Levi Stahl http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21531 Wed, 26 May 2010 03:24:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21531 Chick Stahl--no relation, though you can see why I pay attention--is also an interesting, if sad, story: he committed suicide by drinking carbolic acid just before the next season would have started. The suicide has always been somewhat of a mystery, given Stahl's reputation as an upbeat guy. He left no note, but his last words to his teammates carry a sort of cryptic glory: "Boys, I just couldn't help it. It drove me to it." No one knows what the first "it" represents.

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By: Baseball-Reference Blog » Blog Archive » Highest Pitching WAR to End a Career http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6317/comment-page-1#comment-21526 Wed, 26 May 2010 02:49:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6317#comment-21526 Evan - I answered your question in a new post. Mussina is 5th since (1901).

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