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.400 OBP and done!

Posted by Andy on March 26, 2008

David in Toledo came up with this interesting list:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/pi/shareit/7MGQ

Of course, the new addition he refers to is one Barry Lamar Bonds.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, March 26th, 2008 at 7:15 pm and is filed under Season Finders. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

3 Responses to “.400 OBP and done!”

  1. It is an interesting list. (It think it includes all players with at least 400 PA)

    Chris wrote something similar here. Please see my comment there on how to eliminate Nick Johnson from the list.

  2. Hey Andy and David: Nice Job!
    You made it into a THT article:
    http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/article/something-i-just-learned/

  3. David in Toledo Says:

    Bonds, Jackson, Johnson, Ashburn, Clark, Greenberg, Gessler, Bates, Hamilton, Cullenbine, Nillson.

    Bonds and Jackson, career ends involuntarily. Cullenbine, Bates, and Hamilton were done, even if these numbers don't show it. Cullenbine was living on 137 walks (.224 ba in 1947), and the Tigers had five better outfield choices for 1948. Bates's final-season numbers come primarily from the Federal League. For Sliding Bilily Hamilton, a .405 OB% represented a steep end-of-career decline.

    Gessler changed careers, having another one as an M.D. either in hand or in mind. Nillson changed countries. Greenberg had married $$ and didn't need the grief of playing for the 1948 Pirates. Similarly, Ashburn had endured the 1962 Mets (the great Elio Chacon/Frank Thomas "Yo lo tengo!" story): three more Kenny Lofton years at ages 36-37-38 and he'd have had 3,000 hits, but the pay was poor back then for the indignity of being a Metropolitan. Did Will Clark stop because of nagging injury, and will Nick Johnson be potentially the same story?