Comments on: Consecutive Complete Game Shutouts http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18692 Thu, 13 May 2010 20:17:25 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18692 Pretty amazing to see the 1969 Phillies as one of only four teams to throw four consecutive complete-game shutouts. That team lost 99 games and posted the third-worst team ERA in the NL, ahead of only the expansion Expos and Padres. The four Phillies starters: Jerry Johnson, Woodie Fryman, Grant Jackson, and Rick Wise.

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By: Morten Jonsson http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18666 Thu, 13 May 2010 14:56:21 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18666 That Cardinals five game streak in 1962-63 is interesting for several reasons. It took place over two years, and Ernie Broglio and Curt Simmons each had two of the shutouts. And the two wins at the end of 1962 were hugely important--they were over the Dodgers, making it possible for the Giants to tie for the pennant on the last day of the season.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18634 Thu, 13 May 2010 05:40:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18634 Those Pirate pitchers are not only on each other's most similar pitchers lists, they are on each other's most similar batters lists, too. I read that in part those Pirates were so good because the AL teams agreed with each other not to try to lure players away from Pittsburgh - the hope was this would make Pittsburgh so much better than any other NL team that fans would lose interest and the whole league would collapse in a heap.

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By: Jim http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18624 Thu, 13 May 2010 03:34:34 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18624 Im sure you guys can work up some trivial information about the back to back shutouts in the Yanks-Tigers dodubleheader tonight (albiet it was a split)

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By: Brad http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18622 Thu, 13 May 2010 02:26:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18622 The Reds next starter is Aaron Harang, at home against the Cardinals on Friday. He has an ERA over 6.00 and hasn't had a complete game victory since April of 2009, but the Reds are on a roll right now, so maybe it will rub off on him.

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By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18610 Thu, 13 May 2010 00:59:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18610 JT, you're right about how similar those Pirates starters were. Leever, Phillippe, and Tannehill all have each of the other three members of the rotation on their top-10 comparables lists. Chesbro doesn't have any of the other three on his list, although his numbers were not that different from what the others compiled.

How good were the turn-of-the-century Pirates? The 1902 team won the NL by 27½ games.

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18608 Thu, 13 May 2010 00:38:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18608 I love the 1900-1902 Pirates rotation. Jack Chesbro, Sam Leever, Deacon Phillippe, and Jesse Tannehill, all Hall of Very Good types (Chesbro actually made the HOF) who all ended up with very similar career numbers -- 189 to 197 wins, 2.47 to 2.80 ERAs. I think part of those teams' success was predicated on using those 4 pitchers for ~250 IP each, rather than the 300+ IP which most aces were throwing at the time. Anyway, by 1903 Chesbro and Tannehill were gone, both to the Highlanders.

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By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18605 Wed, 12 May 2010 23:55:21 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18605 Gerry, the Baseball Library chronology implies that all six shutouts by the 1903 Pirates were indeed complete games. The fifth shutout came in a game shortened to six innings by rain.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/6019/comment-page-1#comment-18598 Wed, 12 May 2010 23:15:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=6019#comment-18598 The all-time record for consecutive shutouts is 6, held by the 1903 Pirates, 2-8 June. I don't know for sure that these were all complete games, but given that we're talking about 1903, the chances are pretty good.

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