Comments on: Three 90+ win teams in the same division http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Ruben Amaro http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15429 Wed, 07 Apr 2010 06:46:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15429 Three best teams in the league? Don't waste my time.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15416 Wed, 07 Apr 2010 01:06:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15416 The last time the AL had 3 90-loss teams in a division was 1999, when the Tigers, Royals, and Twins all stank up the Central.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15415 Wed, 07 Apr 2010 00:50:11 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15415 I don't know how many times there have been 3 90-loss teams in a division, but it has happened at least once. The 2001 NL Central featured the Brewers at 94 losses, the Reds at 96, and the Pirates at an even 100. It hasn't happened in the NL since then.

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By: Devon & His 1982 Topps blog http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15380 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 18:01:19 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15380 That makes me wonder now, how many times have there been 3 90-loss teams in a division? Probably never? But it seems like it is possible. Maybe 3 80+ loss teams in same division are more reasonable...

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By: Djibouti http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15378 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:56:59 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15378 "These high win totals were possible because only 3 other teams in the American League were over .500 and the Rays and the Tigers both lost 106 games"

I think that's the key right there, how many really bad teams are there in the AL this year? I don't think there's anyone in the league this year that we can say for sure will lose 100 or close to it. The Royals are pretty bad, but they also have the reigning Cy Young winner pitching every fifth day. The Indians could land anywhere between 80-110 losses depending on how good the young talent is. The Orioles are a perennial threat for 100 losses, but they're also a bit of mystery. The entire AL West is in playoff contention, there are 3 good teams in the Central, and the Blue Jays are middle of the road. So I think they'll fall short of 3 90-game winners, but it will have more to do with how good the rest of the league is than how good those 3 teams are.

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By: Fireworks http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5285/comment-page-1#comment-15355 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 14:06:28 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5285#comment-15355 Interesting post. There has been a lot of talk about these teams all winning a lot of games. How bad the other AL teams are, especially Baltimore and Toronto, will have a lot to say about whether these three teams can all get over 90.

One nitpick, though: the NFL really doesn't have much of a strength-of-schedule equalizer anymore; teams in the same division play 14 of 16 games against the same exact opponents. SOS only accounts for a meager two games now. Not to say that two games doesn't mean much in the NFL season, just that the whole SOS argument is an ol' chestnut analysts like to throw out when discussing why a previously good team performs poorly--especially within the trend of the previous year's Superbowl loser being mediocre the next season--and the reality is SOS isn't much of a factor in explaining why Superbowl losers can't put it together the next season.

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