Comments on: Card of the Week: 1992 Donruss #3 Kyle Abbott http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12601 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 22:47:00 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12601 Library Dave, after 4 pennants in 5 years, Connie Mack broke up the Athletics in 1915. The team went from 99-53 in 1914 to 43-109 in 1915 to 36-117 in 1916, a .235 record, the worst of any team since 1901. Nabors and Sheehan were probably no worse than the batters and fielders who supported them, and were probably the best Mack felt he could afford.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12583 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 12:10:04 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12583 Andy thanks for the info about 1983 Donruss. When I researched this post, I found the suggestion that 1983 cards featured Rated Rookies but I looked at some cards, including Al Chambers' and didn't see the designation--because I checked only the fronts!

Nice work DoubleDiamond. I knew Kyle and Jim were linked by more than just their last name- it was their draft position in consecutive years for the same team I had forgotten.

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By: Library Dave http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12572 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 06:46:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12572 That 1916 Philly team is something else. Were Nabors and Sheehan seriously the best they could run out there? For 47 starts and 19 complete games? Yikes.

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By: Andy Kimball http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12568 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 03:16:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12568 1983 Donruss was actually the first set to include "Rated Rookies." There was no notation on the fronts just on the backs. It read "1983 Donruss Rated Rookie" towards the bottom of the card. I seem to recall that Mel Hall was the best of the bunch that first year. Here's a link to a scan of the back of Al Chambers Rated Rookie:
http://www.checkoutmycards.com/CardImages/Cards/161/760/06b.jpg

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By: MrDave http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12566 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 01:35:31 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12566 I used to love how every year there were a number of these "Rated Rookies" that didn't have any stats on the back of the card (Shawn Abner is one in particular that I can remember). It always made me wonder what exactly they were rated on.

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By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12565 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 00:44:05 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12565 This is the game in which Schilling blew the save:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/PHI/PHI199205080.shtml

I see that another of the Phillies disastrous 1991-1992 offseason acquisitions, Dale Sveum, also appeared in this game. Also, Abbott went 1-for-1 with an RBI double and a walk.

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By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12563 Sun, 28 Mar 2010 00:28:28 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12563 The Phillies acquired both Kyle Abbott and Curt Schilling between the end of the 1991 season and Opening Day 1992. Abbott spent much of the year in the rotation while Schilling bounced back and forth between starting and relieving. I remember another game in which Abbott, still winless, left a game in a position to be the winner but ended up with a no decision after Schilling blew the lead. According to what I read in the newspaper the next day, Schilling felt bad about this.

But 1992 was the year in which it was realized that Curt Schilling, who had already been rejected by three other organizations, had a much better future than Kyle Abbott, a former first round draft pick (in the second of two consecutive years in which the Angels chose a lefthanded pitcher with the last name of Abbott in the opening round). In 1993, Abbott was in AAA at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, and Schilling was in the starting rotation of the National League champions.

Incidentally, Ruben Amaro, Jr., has not continuously been a member of the Phillies organization since the trade that brought him there at the same time as Kyle Abbott. He played for the Cleveland Indians in the 1994 and 1995 seasons, although based on the number of games in which he appeared in those years, he was either injured or in Buffalo most of that time, just as he had spent most of 1993 as Kyle Abbott's teammate at SWB. He was not on the Phillies 1993 postseason roster but did make a couple of appearances for the Indians in the 1995 postseason.

The similarly-named Paul Abbott appeared with the Phillies twelve seasons later than Kyle Abbott. Like Kyle, Paul had a lopsided win-loss record with the Phillies with only one win, but it was "only" 1-6. While Kyle Abbott had been gone from the majors for almost 8 years and the Phillies almost 9 by the time Paul Abbott arrived in Philadelphia, Paul is actually 5 months and 3 days older than Kyle. And Paul Abbott is four days older than Jim Abbott, the lefty-throwing, lefty-fielding pitcher drafted by the Angels the year before Kyle Abbott, who had been gone from the majors for 5 years before Paul Abbott pitched for the Phillies in 2004. (But that stint in Philadelphia was the end of the line for Paul Abbott's major league career.)

Two other Abbotts had major league careers that overlapped with Kyle, Jim, or Paul, but both of them were position players - Kurt (1993-2001) and Jeff (1997-2001). Four of these five Abbotts played their last major league game either for (Paul) or against (Jim, Kurt, and Jeff) the Phillies. Kyle's last game is not noted on his Baseball Reference page, but since he ended up in the AL before the interleague era, he would not have ended his career on August 24, 1996, against the team for which he pitched in 1992 and 1995.

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By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12558 Sat, 27 Mar 2010 22:03:45 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12558 Thanks, JT.

"The minimum number of decisions is the number team games that season divided by twelve rounded to the nearest integer."

Just the way I learned it as a six-year-old, IIRC.

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12557 Sat, 27 Mar 2010 21:32:51 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12557 I don't know whether that criterion for qualifying is official or is something cooked up in the absence of clear official guidelines. It's open to the objection that a 12-2 pitcher would get the title even if there was a 13-0 pitcher in the league. Then again, anyone who gives titles to pitchers for wins and losses is already living in a state of sin.

Mike Parrott, 94 IP on a 57 ERA+. I take it OPS+ is to be interpreted as the OPS+ of opposing hitters, in which case Parrott made the average opposing batter hit like Hank Aaron.

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/5134/comment-page-1#comment-12555 Sat, 27 Mar 2010 20:55:04 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=5134#comment-12555 For W-L% you need at least 14 decisions in a 162-game season.
http://www.baseball-reference.com/about/leader_glossary.shtml#min_req

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