Comments on: Card of the Week: 1960 Topps #321 Ron Fairly All-Star Rookie http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11784 Thu, 04 Mar 2010 20:04:29 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11784 Heh, good point--Alicea and Collins being tied for something is utterly bizarre.

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By: tmckelv http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11783 Thu, 04 Mar 2010 20:00:29 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11783 DavidRF - thanks

Andy - Not only does Luis Alicea hold some sort of offensive record - but he shares it with Eddie Collins.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11649 Mon, 01 Mar 2010 17:45:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11649 Keep in mind that players needn't have been official rookies (going by MLB rules) to qualify for the Topps team. There are numerous examples of them awarding the rookie cup to guys already past their official rookie years.

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By: JDV http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11648 Mon, 01 Mar 2010 17:43:48 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11648 I'd have to guess that Vada Pinson still had his "rookie" status in 1959 after only 27 G & 96 AB prior to that. If so, what an injustice that he was not made a part of that all-rookie team. He even received a hand-full of MVP votes that year (no 1st place votes, but consideration nonetheless).

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By: Ryan http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11646 Mon, 01 Mar 2010 13:06:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11646 All I know is Fairly couldn't be as good of a predictor for Seattle games as the almighty Mike "Nostradamus" Blowers...

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By: Baseball-Reference Blog » Blog Archive » Most extra-base hits in a season with no singles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11645 Mon, 01 Mar 2010 12:50:52 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11645 [...] You Are Here > Baseball-Reference.com > Blog > Baseball Stats and Analysis B-R Blog & Stat of the Day Numbers, News, and Notes « Card of the Week: 1960 Topps #321 Ron Fairly All-Star Rookie [...]

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By: Brian http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11643 Sun, 28 Feb 2010 23:38:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11643 Lifelong Seattle Mariners fan here. You are certainly not in the minority. Just about everyone in Seattle couldn't stand Fairly as a broadcaster. He was the type of guy who would say "Whichever team scores more runs will likely end up winning the game." I have some friends in the broadcasting business, and they have told me that Fairly was really intelligent and told fantastic stories, but he just didn't come across well over the airwaves.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11641 Sun, 28 Feb 2010 20:33:42 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11641 No need to apologize. That sort of free association is one if the things I love about comments on this blog. Duncan certainly makes more as a coach now than he ever made as player, even correcting for inflation.

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By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11640 Sun, 28 Feb 2010 20:18:44 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11640 In fact, I had my facts backwards regarding the team movement made by Jim Fairey in 1973. I knew that he was released by one team after a long holdout in spring training and picked up by another one that sent him to the minors. But I thought he had been released by the Dodgers and picked up by the Expos, instead of the reverse. Also, I thought that he had never made it back to the majors again, but after I checked his Baseball Reference.com page, I saw that he did appear in 10 games for the Dodgers in 1973. I didn't check his 1973 game log to see if they were at the beginning of the season before being cut loose, during the September call-up period, or in mid-season. Whatever happened, though, he never played in the majors again after 1973.

In 1973, I had recently entered the working world and was glad to get any kind of salary my then-limited experience could get for me. In that spring, I remember two players in particular, Jim Fairey and Dave Duncan of the defending World Series winners the Oakland A's, holding out for money and not reporting to spring training. Both had had poor offensive seasons in 1972. Duncan had even lost his starting job to Gene Tenace before the postseason. And in both cases, their teams decided they didn't want them back. Fairey was actually released. Duncan was traded to Cleveland for Ray Fosse. Like a lot of working folks, I was beginning to wonder why these athletes couldn't be happy with just being major leaguers. Fairey ended up losing his job completely and only appearing in 10 more games in his career. Duncan was traded from the top-ranking team in baseball to one of the worst, thus missing out on possibly two more World Series rings. At least he played for a lot more years, including some time with the Orioles when they were a good team, and he's had a notable coaching career. Of course, the money that Fairey and Duncan were demanding in 1973 probably pales compared to what players are asking for today.

Sorry to change the subject and pontificate like this.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/4667/comment-page-1#comment-11636 Sun, 28 Feb 2010 17:10:32 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=4667#comment-11636 Wow, lots of very useful comments here.

First of all, DavidRF, thanks for that extremely interesting chart. Amazing to know that Luis Alicea holds some sort of batting record. Eddie Murray's hold over a large range of values demonstrates how underrated the guy was. I mean--he was an easy Hall of Famer but I'm not sure the average fan really appreciates how consistent the guy was without ever having huge gaudy numbers. He was simply consistently excellent. And interesting that most of the guys toward the bottom of the list are pitchers--unsurprising of course, but still interesting.

#8 Dan--that made me chuckle 🙂

In general I should add some comments about the Mariners broadcasts. When I was able to hear their broadcasts, they had Fairly, Dave Niehaus, Rick Rizzs, Dave Henderson, and Dave Valle. In general, for the whole team, it can be said that they were unbelievable homers. Everything that ever went well for the Mariners was due to the skill of the players, manager, or general managers, while everything that ever went well for the opposing team was blind luck. I saw several instances where the same thing happened to each team in the same game--for example once I think a failed bunt to move a runner was followed by a homer--and Niehaus analyzed the same event completely differently when it happened to the Mariners vs when it happened to the opposing team. In the case of the Mariners, it had been smart for the manager to try to bunt because he knew the guy who followed had a good chance of scoring the run on a homer anyway, so nothing was lost. In the case of the other team, it was extremely stupid for their manager to bunt because they cost themselves a run since, unexpectedly, the following batter hit a homer. As a fan, these guys enraged me to listen to. The only exceptions were Henderson and Valle, who provided interesting insight about the game and specific players, and I think avoid the homerism to the extent possible.

However, I think not all of this can be laid on the broadcasters. Remember that the Seattle baseball franchise has not had a lot of success. They haven't had too many winning seasons and the period I'm talking about saw them with their first truly great player (Griffey.) I think during this time, a lot of Seattle people were becoming fans for the first time and there was a lot of ignorance among their fans. To a large degree, I think the broadcasters tailored their comments to fit the mentality of the audience. Such stuff would never fly in Boston, Philly, St. Louis, or New York, where the local fans are far too educated to accept such homerism, even if it is their own team being favored.

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