Comments on: More on 3B by LHB vs RHB http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2438 Wed, 28 Nov 2007 16:20:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2438 Well...I agree with both of you guys. Rose was obviously a special case, just as Jeter is today, but without doubt a higher fraction of guys played harder back then. Just watching old games on ESPN Classic is a real eye opener. You see a lot of guys run out of the box much faster, a lot more contact on average when breaking up double-plays, and a lot more visible frustration from players who fail to come through. It's certainly true that we cannot point to Rose or Jeter as representative of their eras, but David's general point is true.

]]>
By: Dvd Avins http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2437 Wed, 28 Nov 2007 16:05:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2437 Rose was known as Charlie Hustle BECAUSE his degree of oblivious hustle was unusual. I think 'the good old days' may have been less different than David suggests.

]]>
By: David in Toledo http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2418 Tue, 27 Nov 2007 19:28:47 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2418 Here's two (probably wild) ideas. Everybody used to have to hustle, before free agency and the long guaranteed contracts. And there are a lot more home runs hit today: 1243 hr, 12-team NL in 1980; 2703 with 16 teams in 2007.

So a hitter smashes one in 1965. He runs like hell toward third base until he has evidence that it's okay to slow down. Think Roberto Clemente, Willie Mays, Pete Rose batting right-handed.

In 2007, however, that batter may pause to see if it's a home run. Hustle is not his middle name. Even if he heads toward first base, the batter may not run all-out, particularly if he's right-handed and can't follow the flight of the ball without the risk of tripping on his long pants and looking even more foolish. The ball will probably be caught, or go over the fence, or be thrown to second before he can get there (certainly to third), and he has a long-term contract, everything's cool. (Think, maybe, Manny Ramirez, with 1 triple per 415 ab?)

However, the left-handed batter SEES his line drive heading for the right-field corner or the right-center gap and KNOWS that he has a chance for a three-bagger. Competitive instinct overcomes 2007's cultural complacency and the lefty may be more likely to run hard, based on what he can see as he moves toward first base.

]]>
By: Tom Clancy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2414 Tue, 27 Nov 2007 17:24:01 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2414 Well, the thrown out at third would still be interesting, especially split up by where the ball was hit to.

]]>
By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2413 Tue, 27 Nov 2007 17:11:32 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2413 I believe that studies have shown that advantages for getting to first base vary wildly by batter, regardless of handedness. For example, I think there are lots of lefties who are slower than an average righty, although there are certainly a few lefties (such as Ichiro) who get out of the box tremendously quickly.

]]>
By: Tom Clancy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/443/comment-page-1#comment-2407 Tue, 27 Nov 2007 15:13:11 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/443#comment-2407 It's not all that significant, but lefties get an extra step or two on righties coming out of the box and that might influence their decision/ the third-base coach's perception of whether they have a chance to make 3. Might be interesting to look at rates of getting thrown out at third by handedness, though that might be hard to control. Something like instances where a double was recorded but the player was out and no error?

]]>