Comments on: Best season by a 35-year-old (or why Jorge Posada is seeing dollar signs) http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-2004 Fri, 02 Nov 2007 18:42:43 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-2004 I absolutely love Paul Molitor (in a platonic, baseball-stat kind of way) but I am surprised how easily he made the HOF. I think he really flew under my radar, probably being stuck in Milwaukee for most of his career. But when you look at the numbers, it all makes sense. Here are some of his all-time ranks: ninth in hits, 18th in runs, 11th in doubles, 22nd in total bases, 13th in power-speed number.
Geez, the guy is top 10 all time in hits. Obviously he should have been (and was) a first-ballot HOFer.

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By: vonhayes http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-2003 Fri, 02 Nov 2007 18:25:25 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-2003 Yeah Ortiz's doubles and HR totals flip-flopped this season. It doesn't matter to me, because all of his overall numbers were way up.

Getting back to the original topic (sort of), let's talk about those Elias Player Rankings. I don't think they're good at all, and it's a shame that they have any bearing on the way the MLB works.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1989 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:19:11 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1989 I meant to say...a lot of Ortiz' success in Boston has been due to Manny Ramirez hitting behind him. Ramirez was amazingly productive and consistent until this year, and that helped a lot. If Ramirez' decline has already started, that will hurt Ortiz unless they get someone like A-rod to hit behind him. With A-rod hitting behind him, Ortiz might hit 70 HR.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1988 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:18:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1988 It's tough to know what to expect with Ortiz. I think the only thing that happened this year was that his knee injury robbed him of a bit of his power, but otherwise his hitting was an excellent as ever, and basically his usual homers got converted into doubles. Hit hitting with RISP, etc, were all at top-notch levels and I say he had a fantastic year. Interestingly, I've seen a number of Boston-area media reports saying that he lost his ability to hit in the clutch this year, but those folks are basically measuring that by game-winning (i.e. walk-off homers), forgetting that A) Ortiz cannot manufacture those situations and B) in recent years he's hit exceptionally well in those cases, homering on something like 75% of all cases. He came back to earth a bit and had fewer opportunities, and in any event it's a totally stupid statistic to track or measure someone by. And yet, a lot of the Boston media do it. They, mainly due to the fans not being so smart, are really not so smart.

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By: vonhayes http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1986 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 20:54:03 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1986 Do you expect a guy like Ortiz to have another 5 or 6 great years in him, where he's able to push those all-important counting stats to typical HOF levels? I know he got a late start, but his by-age comparisons don't look promising.

This is a little off topic, but do you find that the consensus among casual fans is that Ortiz had an off year in '07? When I talk to semi-knowledgable baseball fans, everyone seems to say he had a bad year, when in fact it's his best yet.

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By: kingturtle http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1985 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 20:28:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1985 Hey, I love Paul Molitor as much as the next guy. And I remember as a kid joking with my neighbor about how good Molitor would be if he just DHed all the time. But 1174 games at DH for Molitor's career? That's not Hall of Fame material to me. Edgar has 1412 at DH. Blech, as far as HOF goes.

I realize why the AL installed the DH, but it is certainly not necessary anymore. I wish they'd get rid of it. I know the player's union won't let it happen. But they really should can it.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1982 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 19:26:39 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1982 True Johnny. Another thing that goes against Edgar is that he was as slow as dirt. Obviously speed is just one facet of the game, but it's kind of hard to believe that a guy with a .418 career OBP didn't score a lot more runs. He's 22nd all-time in OBP (wow!) and just 152nd all-time in runs scored. He's tied for 104th all-time in GIDP, by the way.

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1981 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 19:13:31 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1981 There haven't been many full-time DHs, period. I'd assume most players who simply do not have the skills to ever play the field don't manage to last long enough to have HOF-worthy careers. I always think of Baines as a full-time DH, but he played over 1000 games in the OF.

A guy with a shot is David Ortiz. Doesn't have too many full-time seasons under his belt, but the few he has have been of very high quality. It could be tough to separate him from the glut of slugging 1B/DH over the past 10-15 seasons, but if he has another few years similar to his last few, then add in his playoff performance and perceived clutch ability, he has a shot, even as a DH.

I don't think Edgar Martinez will make it soon. 20-40 years down the road, it's possible. He may deserve it, I'm not sure. There are a lot of conflicting opinions on the value of a DH. Should any fielder, no matter how bad, get defensive credit over the DH? How much does it limit a team, or how much did it limit the Mariners specifically, to have no flexibility to use the DH to rest others? I doubt most voters will consider such questions in more than a superficial manner.

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By: vonhayes http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1980 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 19:00:55 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1980 Based on those ridiculous offensive numbers, I would say E. Martinez has more of a shot than Posada. Personally, I rate him a lot higher even with the DH stigma.

The only true full-time DH that's been eligible is Baines, right? I mean, as far as legitimate candidates go.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/395/comment-page-1#comment-1977 Thu, 01 Nov 2007 16:47:00 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/sotd/archives/395#comment-1977 It will be interesting to see what kind of support Edgar gets for the HOF. He'll be eligible to be elected in 2010. Have there been many full-time DHs before him to be eligible?

I never liked him much as a person, but it's tough not to like him as a player. From 1995 to 2000 (6 seasons) he never hit below .322...that is QUITE a peak. And barring two seasons he was injured (1993 and 1994), he hit over .300 for 10 straight years. Interesting, based on HOF standards (see his main B-R page) he is exactly 50.0. His HOF Monitor is 131.5, way above the 100 or so required.

I say he gets in eventually. If the M's had gone to a World Series when he was there, he'd probably be a shoo-in.

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