Comments on: Most IP Without Allowing an SB http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/2342 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: bradtempleman http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/2342/comment-page-1#comment-8706 Fri, 28 Aug 2009 17:42:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=2342#comment-8706 Pineiro really is having a special season, also allowing so few walks and home runs. He's also remade himself as a great ground ball pitcher this year after being more of a fly ball pitcher in the past.

]]>
By: JohnnyTwisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/2342/comment-page-1#comment-8702 Fri, 28 Aug 2009 15:39:55 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=2342#comment-8702 By '68 there was a decent amount of running. That combined with his being righty plus all the IP makes Tiant really stand out. Of course, Tiant was amazing in '68 and hardly let anyone on base in the first place. So ideally you'd also want to normalize it for stolen base opportunities. Pineiro already has about as many SB opps as Tiant.

]]>
By: SJBlonger http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/2342/comment-page-1#comment-8701 Fri, 28 Aug 2009 15:18:17 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=2342#comment-8701 My first thought was Holy Cow. But then I remembered that stolen bases were out of fashion in Ford's day. The AL average in 1961 was .35 SB/G compared to .69 SB/G this year. That makes Rogers' performance in 2002 really stand out. It would be interesting to see this stat normalized for league and catcher factors.

]]>