Comments on: Oldest Pitcher in an All Star Game http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/1887 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: tomepp http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/1887/comment-page-1#comment-7396 Wed, 15 Jul 2009 23:33:35 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=1887#comment-7396 Of those players listed, only Satchel Paige and Jamie Moyer were named to their first All-Star game in after their 40th birthday. Paige was a special case, since he was not admitted to the Majors until he was in his 40's. Moyer was just a workhorse pitcher who wasn't consistently good until his mid-30's. Interestingly, he finished in the top 10 in Cy Young voting twice (1999 & 2001, at ages 36 & 38) before being named to an All-Star team.

Most of the rest of these guys - Hall of Famers and likely HoF'ers - had been first named to an All-Star team back in their 20's (Clemens, Ryan, Johnson, Perry, Spahn, and non-HoF'er Reuschel). Of the other three, Wynn (HoF'er) and Martinez (non-HoF'er) were first named to an All-Star team in their mid-30's. Curiously, Early Wynn finished in the top 25 in MVP voting five times (in the top 6 twice) before being named to his first All-Star squad. Maybe his Wins didn't come so Early in those seasons. That leaves just Kenny Rogers, who was named to his first All-Star team in 1995 at age 30, but then not again until age 39. (I wonder if that's a record for the longest stretch between All-Star nominations - I suspect not.)

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By: Should Wakefield’s career be factored into All-Star selection? http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/1887/comment-page-1#comment-7218 Fri, 10 Jul 2009 16:24:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=1887#comment-7218 [...] Game at the ripe old age of 42. As you might have heard, if he gets into the game, he’ll be the 12th pitcher and 30th player ever to play in a Midsummer Classic after his 40th [...]

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By: JohnnyTwisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/1887/comment-page-1#comment-7141 Mon, 06 Jul 2009 15:07:33 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=1887#comment-7141 The MVP vote in '52 doesn't look that odd to me. He led the league in games finished, was 2nd in saves, and picked up 22 decisions in just 138 IP. He was no doubt pitching some high leverage relief innings, and pitched them well (albeit for a poor team). His numbers aren't _that_ inferior to those of Jim Konstanty in 1950, who won the MVP. Keep in mind that there were only 8 teams in the league, but still 10 ballot spots. I think almost every season back then you'll find some down-ballot votes which look a little perplexing -- middle infielders with .600 OPS or something.

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By: damthesehigheels http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/1887/comment-page-1#comment-7134 Mon, 06 Jul 2009 04:45:42 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=1887#comment-7134 There are no splits on Paige's 53 season, but did he have an amazing first half then collapse? or was this a "token" appearance?

Don't take the token there for me suggesting that he didn't deserve it for his career, I understand that, but there's seemingly no reason he should have made an all star game that season.

Also, in 52, am I missing some reason he finished 17th with 12 MVP votes?

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