You Are Here > Baseball-Reference.com > Blog >

SITE NEWS: We are moving all of our site and company news into a single blog for Sports-Reference.com. We'll tag all B-R content, so you can quickly and easily find the content you want.

Also, our existing B-R blog rss feed will be redirected to the new site's feed.

Baseball-Reference.com » Sports Reference

For more from Andy and the gang, check out their new site High Heat Stats.

Colby Lewis: 2.22 ERA in 7 postseason starts

Posted by John Autin on October 21, 2011

WS Game 2 was the 7th postseason start for Colby Lewis, and the 6th time that he went at least 5 innings allowing 2 runs or less. His postseason ERA is 2.22 in 44.2 innings, with a 1.07 WHIP and no unearned runs.

Among the 144 pitchers with at least 6 postseason starts, Lewis ranks 16th in ERA (1st among active pitchers).

Here are the top 50 in postseason starters' ERA:
(min. 6 starts; stats for GS only; numbers in the "Rk" column are off by 1)

Rk Player #Matching   W L W-L% ERA 5 GS CG SHO SV IP H ER HR BB SO WHIP
2 Christy Mathewson 11 Ind. Games 5 5 .500 0.97 11 10 4 0 101.2 75 11 1 10 48 0.84
3 Sandy Koufax 7 Ind. Games 4 3 .571 0.98 7 4 2 0 55.0 36 6 2 11 60 0.85
4 Eddie Plank 6 Ind. Games 2 4 .333 1.17 6 6 0 0 54.0 36 7 0 11 32 0.87
5 George Mullin 6 Ind. Games 3 3 .500 1.38 6 6 1 0 52.0 40 8 1 12 35 1.00
6 George Earnshaw 8 Ind. Games 4 3 .571 1.58 8 5 1 0 62.2 39 11 2 17 56 0.89
7 Scott McGregor 6 Ind. Games 3 3 .500 1.63 6 3 2 0 49.2 37 9 3 8 26 0.91
8 Carl Hubbell 6 Ind. Games 4 2 .667 1.79 6 4 0 0 50.1 40 10 3 12 32 1.03
9 Waite Hoyt 11 Ind. Games 6 4 .600 1.85 11 6 1 0 82.2 81 17 2 22 47 1.25
10 Bob Gibson 9 Ind. Games 7 2 .778 1.89 9 8 2 0 81.0 55 17 6 17 92 0.89
11 Art Nehf 9 Ind. Games 4 4 .500 1.98 9 6 2 0 77.1 48 17 1 31 28 1.02
12 Fernando Valenzuela 8 Ind. Games 5 1 .833 2.00 8 2 0 0 63.0 47 14 3 29 44 1.21
13 Doug Drabek 7 Ind. Games 2 5 .286 2.05 7 2 0 0 48.1 40 11 1 14 33 1.12
14 Johnny Podres 6 Ind. Games 4 1 .800 2.11 6 2 1 0 38.1 29 9 3 13 18 1.10
15 Vic Raschi 8 Ind. Games 5 3 .625 2.15 8 3 1 0 58.2 49 14 5 23 42 1.23
16 Colby Lewis 7 Ind. Games 4 1 .800 2.22 7 0 0 0 44.2 29 11 6 19 40 1.07
17 Curt Schilling 19 Ind. Games 11 2 .846 2.23 19 4 2 0 133.1 104 33 12 25 120 0.97
18 Jack Billingham 6 Ind. Games 1 1 .500 2.29 6 0 0 0 35.1 25 9 0 12 29 1.05
19 Bruce Hurst 7 Ind. Games 3 2 .600 2.29 7 3 0 0 51.0 46 13 6 12 37 1.14
20 Ken Holtzman 12 Ind. Games 6 4 .600 2.30 12 2 1 0 70.1 60 18 2 18 39 1.11
21 Mark Mulder 7 Ind. Games 3 4 .429 2.34 7 0 0 0 42.1 50 11 2 9 29 1.39
22 Jon Lester 6 Ind. Games 2 3 .400 2.35 6 0 0 0 38.1 31 10 4 12 34 1.12
23 Carl Mays 7 Ind. Games 3 4 .429 2.37 7 5 1 0 57.0 46 15 0 8 17 0.95
24 Juan Guzman 8 Ind. Games 5 1 .833 2.44 8 0 0 0 51.2 42 14 1 27 41 1.34
25 Chief Bender 10 Ind. Games 6 4 .600 2.44 10 9 1 0 85.0 65 23 1 21 59 1.01
26 Dave McNally 12 Ind. Games 6 4 .600 2.51 12 6 2 0 89.2 65 25 12 33 65 1.09
27 Cliff Lee 11 Ind. Games 7 3 .700 2.52 11 3 0 0 82.0 66 23 2 10 89 0.93
28 John Smoltz 27 Ind. Games 13 4 .765 2.55 27 2 1 0 187.1 151 53 14 63 177 1.14
29 Eddie Lopat 7 Ind. Games 4 1 .800 2.60 7 3 0 0 52.0 51 15 0 12 19 1.21
30 Dave Stewart 18 Ind. Games 10 4 .714 2.62 18 3 1 0 130.2 94 38 12 46 71 1.07
31 Don Drysdale 6 Ind. Games 3 3 .500 2.63 6 3 1 0 37.2 34 11 7 11 35 1.19
32 Red Ruffing 10 Ind. Games 7 2 .778 2.63 10 8 0 0 85.2 74 25 4 27 61 1.18
33 Orlando Hernandez 14 Ind. Games 9 2 .818 2.64 14 0 0 0 95.1 70 28 8 51 93 1.27
34 Jack Coombs 6 Ind. Games 5 0 1.000 2.70 6 4 0 0 53.1 42 16 1 21 34 1.18
35 Tommy John 13 Ind. Games 6 3 .667 2.71 13 3 1 0 86.1 80 26 6 24 46 1.20
36 Orel Hershiser 18 Ind. Games 8 3 .727 2.71 18 4 2 0 126.1 102 38 8 40 91 1.12
37 Whitey Ford 22 Ind. Games 10 8 .556 2.71 22 7 3 0 146.0 132 44 8 34 94 1.14
38 Don Larsen 6 Ind. Games 2 2 .500 2.73 6 1 1 0 26.1 18 8 2 13 20 1.18
39 Jim Palmer 15 Ind. Games 7 3 .700 2.75 15 6 2 0 118.0 97 36 10 48 88 1.23
40 Tom Seaver 8 Ind. Games 3 3 .500 2.77 8 2 0 0 61.2 51 19 6 16 51 1.09
41 Bert Blyleven 6 Ind. Games 4 1 .800 2.83 6 1 0 0 41.1 38 13 5 7 31 1.09
42 Allie Reynolds 9 Ind. Games 5 2 .714 2.83 9 5 2 0 66.2 56 21 7 30 49 1.29
43 Steve Avery 12 Ind. Games 5 2 .714 2.84 12 0 0 0 73.0 55 23 6 24 58 1.08
44 Mike Cuellar 12 Ind. Games 4 4 .500 2.85 12 4 0 0 85.1 66 27 7 31 56 1.14
45 Lefty Gomez 7 Ind. Games 6 0 1.000 2.86 7 4 0 0 50.1 51 16 2 15 31 1.31
46 John Candelaria 6 Ind. Games 2 2 .500 2.88 6 0 0 0 34.1 33 11 5 11 29 1.28
47 Bill Donovan 6 Ind. Games 1 4 .200 2.88 6 5 0 0 50.0 41 16 1 17 33 1.16
48 Ralph Terry 6 Ind. Games 2 3 .400 2.88 6 2 1 0 40.2 35 13 4 5 28 0.98
49 Lew Burdette 6 Ind. Games 4 2 .667 2.92 6 4 2 0 49.1 43 16 6 8 25 1.03
50 Bullet Joe Bush 6 Ind. Games 2 4 .333 2.94 6 5 0 0 52.0 45 17 1 18 16 1.21
51 Mort Cooper 6 Ind. Games 2 3 .400 3.00 6 2 1 0 45.0 37 15 3 12 35 1.09
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 10/21/2011.

 

This entry was posted on Friday, October 21st, 2011 at 10:53 am and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

14 Responses to “Colby Lewis: 2.22 ERA in 7 postseason starts”

  1. Those are some mediocre W-L records for those pitchers. Seems like a lot of bad luck.

  2. Can ERA+ be calculated? Or is that too hard because the games are happening across several postseasons?

  3. It's kind of interesting how Ozzie Smith's HR in the 1985 NLCS changed baseball history. Fernando's excellent 1985 NLCS is completely forgotten because of it. Either he or Bill Madlock would have probably been the '85 lcs MVP had the Dodgers won. Who knows what Fernando would have done in the '85 World Series?

    I've never understood why Blyleven's post-season success was never talked about by the main stream sports media.

    Bruce Hurst terrific post-season pitching just gets lost because of the Red Sox's terrible play. His contributions to the '88 Red Sox are completely forgotten.

  4. Look at some of these K/BB ratios.
    - Cliff Lee: 8.9 in 11 games
    - Ralph Terry: 5.6 in 6 games
    - Sandy Koufax: 5.5 in 7 games
    - Bob Gibson: 5.4 in 9 games
    - Curt Schilling: 4.8 in 19 games
    - Christy Mathewson: 4.8 in 11 games
    - Bert Blyleven: 4.4 in 6 games

    Lee's 8.9 is almost incomprehensible, especially over 11 starts. Schilling is also particularly impressive, given the 19 starts. That's equivalent to over half a season.

    Other

  5. @4 Doug

    Last year Lee made 5 post seasons starts, striking out 47 and walking only 2. How's that for incomprehensible? A 23.5 K/BB ratio while facing the best teams in baseball.

  6. Lawrence Azrin Says:

    @2/ BSK -
    "Can ERA+ be calculated? Or is that too hard because the games are happening across several postseasons?"

    ERA+ for regular seasons is also calculated for more than one season, as a career stat.

    But the problem is, would the baseline for postseason ERA+ be:
    - regular season ERA that year?
    - postseason ERA that year?
    - postseason ERA in just that series that year?

    I think I just answered your question.

    @3/ John Q -
    "... Bruce Hurst's terrific post-season pitching just gets lost because of the Red Sox's terrible play. His contributions to the '88 Red Sox are completely forgotten."

    John, Red Sox fans certainly appreciated Hurst when he was with them; a lot of them did not want him to leave as a free agent after the 1988 season. He would have been the 1986 WS MVP, if not for the 10th inning of Game 6. As I matter of fact, I distinctly remember the Shea Stadium scoreboard flashing "Congratulations Bruce Hurst, 1986 World Series MVP" for a few seconds just before you-know-what happened.

    I am not sure what you mean by "because of the Red Sox's terrible play", even if you are specifically referring to their collapse this September. That month doesn't negate what Red Sox players did before that for 111 years.

  7. @6, Lawrence -- Perhaps John Q. just meant Boston's poor play in the '88 ALCS, when they were swept by Oakland.

    Speaking of Bruce Hurst ... Wow, he won 2 CG in the '86 postseason in which he allowed 10+ hits. There've been just 11 such games in the past 60 years. Since 1920, only Hurst, Tommy Bridges and Waite Hoyt have more than 1 such game (Hoyt has 3).

  8. LA-

    I sort of assumed that career ERA+ is simply the compilation of the individual season ERA+'s. So a 200 IP season with 150 ERA+ and a 100 IP season with 100 ERA+ would work out to 133 ERA+ for career (200*150 + 100*100 / 200 + 100). Is that how it is calculated?

    Postseason numbers seem much tougher, for the reasons you offered.

  9. Lawrence Azrin Says:

    John Autin -

    "@6, Lawrence -- Perhaps John Q. just meant Boston's poor play in the '88 ALCS, when they were swept by Oakland..."

    John A., I see your point. My apologies to John Q.; it would be easy to ignore Hurst's fine pitching in the 1988 ALCS when he went 0-2, despite a 2.77 ERA (4 runs/ 13 IP).

    That 1988 ALCS loss was a disappointing coda after "Morgan Magic" after the All-Star break.

  10. Lawrence Azrin Says:

    BSK/ - "@9/ LA- I sort of assumed that career ERA+ is simply the compilation of the individual season ERA+'s. ... "

    Yes, I also assume that you scale career ERA+ proportionately by IP, and not just add the season totals up and divide by the seasons total,in the same way that career BA is not figured by that method. However, career BA is simply {hits/at bats}; career ERA+ is more complicated.

    Any place to go here on B-R for a definition?

  11. @10
    I believe an equivalent "lgER" for the pitchers IP for each year has to be calculated. Then the career contextual "lgERA" for a pitcher is 9*sum(lgER)/sum(IP).

    I remember reading something like that somewhere, but I can't seem to find it.

  12. Lawrence Azrin Says:

    @11/ DavidRF -
    Thanks, I was trying to say something like that, but in English, not mathmatically. So how do we do this for the postseason,or is it not defined yet?

  13. @12
    I don't know. You'd have to figure out the 'run context' of the series.

    NL ERA: 3.81
    STL PPF: 95

    AL ERA: 4.08
    TEX PPF: 109

    ... but Park Factors are deceptively complex. They assume a team plays road games in all the other parks in the league and doesn't have to face its own batters, etc. And they are calculated over multiple years to smooth the data. I don't know how to apply them to a short series played by two teams.

  14. A bit off-topic, but I'll offer:

    Career ERA+ is tricky, and I've posited a version of this discussion when the change in the formula was being contemplated. Because the denominator is the individual ERA, summing is complicated. I do it this way:

    - find the "percentage better than average " by calculating (ERA+ minus 100)/(ERA+) -- so an ERA+ of 200 is 50% better than average, since an ERA of 2.25 in a league of 4.50 is 50% lower
    - weight the "percentage better" by innings pitched
    - sum it all, divide by total innings pitched, for "overall percentage better"
    - translate that back into the ERA+ formula we recognize by dividing 100 by 1 minus the "overall percentage better"

    This is often slightly different from the "career" value found on B-R pitcher pages, because that's calculated using total earned runs and total league runs (which are just earned runs times ERA+ divided by 100 for each season) -- it can be skewed by extreme high-run or low-run environments, as runs in those seasons get more than their fair impact on the sums.

    I'm not sure that's in English, but that's how I figger it!