Comments on: Teams With 3+ SP Under Age 30 With 30+ GS & ERA+ > 99 In Same Season http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Brendan http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155700 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 22:37:30 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155700 I am the first person to mention Bartman in this conversation.

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155652 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 20:33:54 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155652 @30/ Kahuna Tuna - I'm glad someone else is reading my comments more closely than I am, thanks for the correction.

I did a little research and discovered that rosters were around 14-15 c. 1900, varied a lot the next decade but stabilized at 25 around 1910, still going down every now and then for several decades. From 1957 to 1968, Opening Day rosters were 28 till May 1st, when they went back to 25.

I am sure there are many other wrinkles to the history of roster-sizes.

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By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155615 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 19:18:13 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155615 One small correction to your post #29, Lawrence — there were only 26 MLB teams in the collusion year 1986.

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155602 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 18:41:35 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155602 @28/ DvD Avins - I think this "optional" approach to a full 25 man roster was the same year (1986) that the collusion judgement was handed down against all 30 MLB teams. I'm sure this is not a coincidence...

While we are on the roster subject, does anyone know when the 25 man roster became standard? 1912? 1915? I know that roster sizes grew rapidly in the first decade of the 1900s, as the economic strength of MLB improved.

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By: Dvd Avins http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155590 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 18:08:22 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155590 @26 The official roster limit was still 25, but clubs were not required to fill all 25 slots and agreed with each other that they would not. I don't think the lack of requirement to fill the slots was new, just the decision to not fill them. I don't think it lasted more than a few months, but I'm not sure.

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By: Splash Hits: Cody Ross, Brett Pill, Ian Kennedy » Giants Nirvana | SF Giants Blog http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155573 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 17:03:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155573 [...] Teams With 3+ SP Under Age 30 With 30+ GS & ERA+ > 99 In Same Season » Baseball-Reference Bl... Since 1901, how many teams had 3+ starters, age 29 or younger, with 30+ Games Started and an ERA+ of 100+ in the same season? [...]

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155560 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 16:19:39 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155560 @21/ Charles - Thanks

Another roster-size oddity is that in the mid-80s (1986?) the roster size was cut to 24 for a year or two. Odd.

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By: Brent http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155543 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 15:37:52 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155543 Charles @19

Can you imagine if Bucky Harris had pulled a stunt like that in today's media? He starts his 6th best pitcher in Game 7 of the WS?? For a team that had never been to a WS, let alone win one? Against, to that point, the greatest franchise in baseball.

All to get a rookie 1bman out of the lineup (albeit a very hot rookie IBman who went on to have a HOF career), so his closer (Firpo Marberry) and best pitcher (W. Johnson) wouldn't have to face him in the later innings, if the game went that far.

Oh yeah, against the most famous and probably best (certainly considered the best at that time) manager in baseball.

Big cajones. Very big cajones.

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By: Kahuna Tuna http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155536 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 15:29:37 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155536 The 1971 Brewers still make me scratch my head. Marty Pattin was a legitimately good pitching prospect drafted from the Angels organization who had a solid big-league career — no mystery there. But journeyman Skip Lockwood was the 23rd of 30 players whom the Pilots picked in the '68 expansion draft; he'd gone 5-12 for the Brewers in 1970. And Bill Parsons, drafted in the 7th round out of community college in 1968, was a raw rookie in 1971 who had a poor 1972 and whose career ended in 1973 when he came down with a worse case of Steve Blass Disease than Steve Blass. It was a very obscure trio, but of course they all got plenty of chances with an expansion club in its third year of existence.

Here's another fact that makes the '71 Brewers' good starting pitching so surprising. In February 1971, in an effort to shore up their feeble offense, the Brewers had traded veteran lefty starter Al Downing (2-10 as a Brewer in 1970, 113 ERA+, three days too old to play as a 29-year-old in 1971) to the Dodgers in exchange for veteran corner IF/OF Andy Kosco. Downing had a career year for L.A. in 1971, going 20-9 and finishing third in the NL Cy Young voting. Kosco hit .227 with 10 homers for Milwaukee; he was traded to the Angels after the season for the even more obscure corner IF/OF Tommie Reynolds.

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By: pauley http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/15216/comment-page-1#comment-155529 Wed, 21 Sep 2011 15:15:58 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=15216#comment-155529 17- I don't think I (or Bill James) was being too hard on Cox. Not being able to look a few innings ahead and see Quisenberry (or Henke) waiting is bad enough. But for it to happen and cost you a shot at the World Series, to get called out in a major publication, then to have the same scenario happen again in the World Series just seven years later is a major mistake. And in '92 it wasn't just losing a left handed bat, it was losing your best hitter in the series, and pinch hitting for a guy who was 2-3 with a double in that game. Plus he broke an unwritten cardinal rule- (maybe its not an unwritten cardinal rule but it should be) never pinch hit for a Hall of Famer. It doesn't matter that the particular Hall of Fame is Canton in this case.

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