Comments on: Konerko has 16 intentional walks. How’s that working out? http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-151147 Tue, 13 Sep 2011 22:35:29 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-151147 I reality, would it work out, though?

I went into the game finder and searched for games where TOB (including reaching on error) was 1, IBB=1, Runs =0 and compared it to runs =1
10% of the time the IBB runner scored

I went into the game finder and searched for batters where TOB (including reaching on error) was 1, BB=1, Runs =0 and compared it to runs =1
24% of the time he walked, he scored.

I went into the game finder and searched for games where TOB (including reaching on error) was 1, single=1, Runs =0 and compared it to runs =1. 24% of the time the batter hitting the single scored.

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By: mosc http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-151024 Tue, 13 Sep 2011 18:54:29 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-151024 you can use RE24 to judge intentional walks pretty well. You take the RE24 situational expectation of the situation - the one after the intentional walk. That's the run possibility you've just ADDED. Now you take the RE24/ab of the guy you're walking - the RE24/ab of the guy you're going to face. That's the RE24 threat you've walked.

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By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150541 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 22:15:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150541 Dan Uggla is sitting with 898 H, 898 SO today. First time since Aug. 30 that they've been equal.

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By: Whiz http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150520 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 20:32:53 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150520 @22, Yes, Mark Reynolds has the most SO for having SO >= 1000*AVG in a single year; second place is Dean Chance with 63 SO and a .054 AVG in, not surprisingly, 1968. In fact, spots 2 through 79 on the list are pitchers.

Reggie Jackson darn near had SO > 10000*AVG for his career, with 2597 SO and a .262 AVG (he actually had SO = 9914*AVG).

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150503 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 19:22:18 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150503 @28-@37, HRs>KOs:

I think a more reasonable standard nowadays in this era of high strikeouts would be {Extra Base Hits} > Strikeouts. Albert Pujols, one of the few current power hitters who doesn't KO very often, has 908 XBHs vs. 698K's. He's done it every individual year since his rookie year. A-Rod, for example, isn't close for his career.

Looking at this year's Red Sox, Rangers, and Yankees regulars, only Adrian Beltre has XBHs> Ks (Ian Kinsler has +1 KO).

Just what the world needs now, another useless junk-stat...

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By: Mike L http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150492 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:44:50 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150492 Joe Sewell had, over the last nine years of his career, covering close to 5400 plate appearances, 61 HRs and 49 Ks.

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By: Richard Chester http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150480 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:01:40 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150480 @35

Since Vic Power did it in 1958 only George Brett (1980) and Bonds (2004) have done it.

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150462 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 17:09:03 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150462 @33/ Adam - more useless trivia:
Ted Kluszewski had four straight full years of HR's>K's, from 1953 to 1956. Dimaggio did it five times in row (1937-41), but with HR totals not as impressive as Klu's (tho his K totals were lower). Johnny Mize led the NL in HRs two straight years with HR's>K's, 1947-48.

I'm guessing that Barry Bonds is the last power hitter do this in 2004 (45 HR/ 41 K), though he came close in 1994 and 2002.

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By: Mike L http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150449 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 16:26:09 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150449 @33, that would have been true with Yogi Berra as well-he finished with 358/414. Through 1959 (he was 34) he had 302 HRs and 325 K.

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By: Adam http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/14932/comment-page-1#comment-150447 Mon, 12 Sep 2011 16:13:55 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=14932#comment-150447 @24 & 28 (& unintentionally @12)

Though he didn't quite make it into the 300 HR and 300 K club, Ted Kluszewski came pretty close with 279 HR's and 365 K's. I mention this since he came into the league right at the tail end of DiMaggio's career and I think it is also worth noting that as of the end of the1956 season (age 31) he had 251 HR's and 253 K's. Even in older days high HR and low K numbers were not exceptionally common (although much more so than now), so I think that considering the time frame what Kluzewski did is somewhat impressive.

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