Comments on: Longest Streaks With 6+ IP On The Road Since 1919 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-130276 Fri, 22 Jul 2011 01:21:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-130276 Nowadays, a pitcher may be taken out before he gets into trouble because of the pitch count. In the past, they probably weren't taken out until they ran into trouble. Roughly 70% of the 6 inning games were quality starts in the earlier seven year period vs roughly 80% in recent years. I don't know if this is a general trend for the past 90 years or it was just because of the two time periods selected.

]]>
By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-130273 Fri, 22 Jul 2011 01:11:57 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-130273 If you only cosider away games started.

From 1919 to 1926 there were 18 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 5 pitchers started 125 games or more away games..

From 1927 to 1934 there were 13 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 2 pitchers started 125 games or more away games.

From 1935 to 1942 there were 11 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 3 pitchers started 125 games or more away games.

From 1987 to 1994 there were 10 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 7 pitchers started 125 games or more away games..

From 1995 to 2002 there were 8 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 6 pitchers started 125 games or more away games.

From 2003 to 2010 there were 6 streaks of 20 away GS with 6 or more innings. 10 pitchers started 125 games or more away games.

From 1929 to 1949 there were 9 streaks of 30 or more.
From 1989 to 2011 there were 4 streaks of 30 or more.

From 1919 to 1926 (8 years) there were 18 streaks of 20 or more with 147 pitchers with 40 or more total starts.
From 1993 to 2011 (19 years) there were 19 streaks of 20 or more with 545 pitchers with 40 or more total starts.

From 1919 to 1926 74% of away starters went 6 innings with 49% quality starts.
From 1919 to 1926 76% of home starters went 6 innings with 54% quality starts.
From 2003 to 2010 58% of away starters went 6 innings with 46% quality starts.
From 2003 to 2010 64% of starters went 6 innings with 52% quality starts.

The table above shows 1 20 game streak in the 1930's
If the play index is revise to only examine starting pitchers there are 16.
For example:
Lefty Grove with his 19-2 record in 21 consecutive starts also had 12 relief appearances in away games during the streak, going 2-1 with 8 saves.

]]>
By: CHARLES http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129924 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 22:01:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129924 I looked at the number of pitchers with at least 200 career starts within 20 year blocks from and the number of pitchers on the list. You can see the % from 1939 to 2011 is fairly consistent. You might see the number of pitchers on the consecutive game list from 1919 to 1949 go up if the table were revised to only consider games started on the road. Pitchers on the list more than once were only counted once per 20 year time period. I did not take into account if the pitchers themselves had 200 career starts. You can see it's about 5 pitchers/club with 200 career starts except for the two data sets from WWII.

1919-1939 81 4 5%
1929-1949 58 4 7%
1939-1959 55 8 15%
1949-1969 86 12 14%
1959-1979 120 17 14%
1969-1989 134 23 17%
1979-1999 140 22 16%
1989-2011 156 19 12%

]]>
By: CHARLES http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129914 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 21:11:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129914 One of Randy Johnson's streaks and one of Wilbur Copper's streaks include a relief appearance on the road with 6 innings or more. GS does not match the streak.

What I've noticed about low inning outings in the 1930s, it's almost always because they've given up three or more runs. You also occasionally see CG less than 6 innings. Maybe the manager will let them pitch through it in a home game. Also, maybe they were less likely to take a day off back then if they didn't feel well.

]]>
By: Neil L. http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129808 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 15:35:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129808 @28
Ah, disregard most of the last post. It helps to actually try and look something up instead of being lazy. 🙁

Unscientifically, I eyeballed the gamelogs of Burleigh Grimes in his 1928 season with Pittsburg. While most of his road apperances were 8+ IP, he was used in relief enough times, always pitching less than 6 innings, to break any potential streak.

So the answer has to do with pitcher usage in the old days. Starters were used to eat a couple if innings in relief from time to time, particularly in stretches where there were a couple of double headers close together.

]]>
By: Neil L. http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129796 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 15:10:49 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129796 @17 @21
Johnny, I didn't think that relief appearances of 6 innings or more might have been more common before 1950 than today.

But if you examine the list again, you will see that every game included from every streak is a start. No 6+ IP relief appearances in sight!

It's not a big deal, but the question about the uneven distribution of the road streaks across eras remains unanswered.

Nash's explanation @22 may have a bit more merit.

If we use the number of streaks in a given decade as a rough measure of road pitching effectiveness, then the conclusion is pitchers before 1950 were not left in road games as much. Presumably, they didn't pitch on the road as well as at home. Again, why?

]]>
By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129704 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 10:03:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129704 Walter Johnson holds the record at 82 from 1911 to 1915.

]]>
By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129676 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 03:34:07 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129676 Actually Cooper's streak was 44 because one of the 7 inning outings on the road was as a reliever. He did go on to have 17 straight after the streak 61/62.

]]>
By: Charles http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129672 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 03:12:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129672 @ 23 Wilbur Cooper's two streaks would be 45 consecutive road starts with 6 or more innings.

Bob Gibsons streak in 1965 began on April 23 with 48 consecutive road starts with 6 or more innings. He had 87 out of 88 road starts with 6 or more innings from April 23, 1965 to April 21, 1970. The one miss was a game on Sept. 7, 1967, his first game since July 15 when he broke his leg. On Sept. 7 he piched to one batter in the 6th, left with an 8-1 lead and earned the victory.

From April 23, 1965 to April 25, 1972 he had 147 road starts, 143 were 6 innings or more. That would include all his games in 1966, 1968, 1969 and 1971

For his career he had 134 road wins with a 2.76 ERA and 117 home wins with a 3.08 ERA.

]]>
By: Kingturtle http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/13107/comment-page-1#comment-129671 Wed, 20 Jul 2011 03:00:04 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=13107#comment-129671 Bob Gibson is on the list 4 times! Seaver, 5!!

]]>