Comments on: Kosuke Fukudome and why batting average is a lousy stat http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-123566 Thu, 23 Jun 2011 22:47:34 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-123566 How I'm coming up with those percentages again is this:

Hits + Walks + HBP= Total - HRS = X (total times on base minus HRS hit)

Runs - HRS = Y (total runs scored minus HR's hit)

Y divided by X = percentage (scoring probability outside HRS hit)

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-123560 Thu, 23 Jun 2011 22:28:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-123560 Using the same methods I did with McGwire...here are some select few I came up with. Henderson-40%,Cobb-39%,Gherig-37%,Ruth-34%,Rose-35%,Morgan-33%,T Williams-30%,Bonds-30%,Dawson-31%,Killebrew-23%. Not sure what that means...but isn't it sort of funny that Dawson who many thought wasn't HOF material because his OBP wasn't high enough..had a higher scoring percentage when he did get on base than Bonds or T Williams? I say...the pitchers and mgs knew what they were doing in walking alot of these guys! You men can look at OBP with awe if you want...but I'd say it's just part of the game..and as such...l still feel if you want to incorporate it..do it with the top of order guys!

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-123407 Thu, 23 Jun 2011 13:30:42 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-123407 @82..good points. Mark McGwire scored 1,167 runs , 583 in which he drove himself in (almost half)..the remaining hits + walks+HBP=2434 times on base..if my math serves me right, outside his HRS he scored 24 percent of the time he was on base. Now...I'll let you stat geeks (respectfully stated..LOL) determine if that is a good percentage or not...get back at me please!

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-123289 Thu, 23 Jun 2011 03:32:45 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-123289 Bubbah, you're assuming those batters are "trying" to work walks. Wouldn't you rather have a walk than a weakly hit ball if the batter didn't feel he could handle any of the pitches he saw?

Giambi has drawn 438 walks with a runner on first. I'll leave it to you to determine how that compares to other batters. Don't you think pitchers' choices might have something to do with all the walks he drew with a base open?

Rarely did those walks translate into runs.

Prove it.

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By: Bubbah http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-123213 Wed, 22 Jun 2011 22:08:09 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-123213 At some point trying to work a walk, rather than trying to drive in a runner, has a negative impact when it's a middle of the order run producer doing it. Jason Giambi worked a lot of useless walks. He clogged up the basepaths when he got on. Rarely did those walks translate into runs.
Man on third less than 2 outs....a hitter should be trying to drive that runner in, not working a walk and leaving it up to the next guy.

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-122646 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 12:14:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-122646 Addendum: TB and BA ONLY demonstrates "hitting" ability. If one is inclined, they could add walks and HBP in ontop of their "hitting" ability to determine their "total on base ability"...which many times a hitter has NO control over..which makes OBP in itself a very subjective tool to look at when looking at a players overall career. In other words.. BA and TB is what a player actually done....OBP "could" be a by.product of decisions made by pitchers/mgrs..which a player has NO control over. Hope that helps!

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-122644 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 11:53:48 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-122644 Baseball is a funny game..one can view it through a calculator or simply view it through the beauty in which it "really" is. My methodology of viewing a players "hitting" ability may be over simplistic...but...I would debate Bill James himself on its usefulness and its validity! To answer your question Neil..yes TB includes slugging..thus..WHY rehash old news? I strongly suggest people to use the KISS method..keep it simple stupid!

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By: Neil L. http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-122590 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 04:12:12 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-122590 @76 @77
With respect, MLS, is "total bases" not the same as slugging percentage? I'm not quite sure what TB plus BA means. Is that OPS without the OBP component?

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-122558 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 03:18:21 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-122558 Neil L....your argument would be valid if it were only true. Explain the Williams shift or the Howard shift if you would be so kind. IF reaching 1st base was soooo important...a well placed bunt gets you to 1st EVERY time....the truth is..Williams and Howards jobs were/are to hit xtra basehits...standing on first is NOT in scoring position!

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By: MLS http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/12007/comment-page-1#comment-122553 Tue, 21 Jun 2011 03:12:34 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=12007#comment-122553 Personally, since the early 60's I have looked at 2 stats to determine who truly were great hitters, BA and Total Base (162 game ave). Any "hitter" that has a total of 600 or more when added up (TB plus BA) can be considered "great hitters". Reasoning: 1) BA demonstrates they can hit ML pitchers consistantly, 2) the higher the TB (162 game ave) equates to that hitter being in scoring position more often, and 3) since there's less than 70 "hitters" to ever reach that plateau..speaks volumes! (Note: every bona fide..unarguable..truly great "hitter" has made that magic 600 mark)

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