Comments on: 2,975+ Hits Since 1919 By BABIP http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Kenny B http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-117309 Wed, 01 Jun 2011 08:03:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-117309 @41

Carlos Gonzalez is also another example of this, although he had a lot more home runs then Gardner. His BABIP last year was .384, he had a .336 .376 .598 slash line and 135 SO's and a 23% k rate. This year so far his BABIP is down to .286, his slash line has fallen considerably to .262 .336 .440 and hes got 39 ks for a 20.4% k rate. Hes on pace for about 10HRs less from last year to.

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-116090 Fri, 27 May 2011 18:15:27 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-116090 Yes, everyone except the catcher must start in fair territory.

As for noting positions, when a guy moves to another area for a particular batter (e.g. the third baseman moving to shallow right for a left pull hitter), his officially denoted position does not change. If a team were to play with 4 outfielders or something throughout the entire game, that's a good question as to how they would be marked.

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By: BSK http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-116061 Fri, 27 May 2011 16:38:16 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-116061 JT-

Thanks for weighing in. I'd be curious to see the efficiencies of different alignments, though they'd obviously have to be done in the theoretical. I applaud those managers who are daring enough to rethink convention, especially if they are doing it based on hard data. Baseball is unlike other sports with regards to positioning. Basketball and hockey have positions but, except for the goalie, they are all very fluid. LeBron James might be your SF, but he might also bring the ball up, guard the other teams 2-guard, or crash the boards, jobs typically associated with other positions (LeBron is obviously a bit of a freak, but still). This would be akin to the SS and CF switching positions randomly for a batter or two. Football is somewhere in between the two. They actually have rules limiting the movement and use of certain players (linemen), but everything else is pretty fluid and we often see new variations (or old variations brought back) on certain positions (scatback; wildcat QB). Defense is entirely fluid and we see teams like the Steelers take advantage of this with what some call the "Times Square defense", where everyone just mills around randomly before the snap.

Baseball has seemingly static and rigid positions, though realistically, anything is possible. Outside of the pitcher and catcher, I don't know of any limitations on positioning (do you even need to position guys in fair territory?); you could put 7 OFs out there. The question would be, what would their positions be? How would you number them? Does the rulebook actually stipulate how you list guys on a lineup card? Outside of the DH and P, it'd seem like you wouldn't really have to, as long as one guy lined up behind the plate with the gear on.

Fascinating stuff. I'll see if I can dig up some info on the history of positioning. It seems like it could make for an awesome research project/book.

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By: Johnny Twisto http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-116049 Fri, 27 May 2011 16:11:12 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-116049 BSK/49, I'm not that familiar with the history of baseball positioning. I'm sure there was a period of evolution but certainly the positions we know today have been in place for a very long time. I'm sure they are pretty close to optimal. In the last decade or so, I think we are seeing a lot more dramatic shifting for various batters. This is probably because of increased data about where individuals actually hit the ball, so defenses are adapting.

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By: BSK http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-116033 Fri, 27 May 2011 15:21:05 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-116033 John M-

Are you not counting ARod as a SS? To this point, he has played 10938 innings at SS and 8866.2 innings at 3B. Assuming he remains an everyday 3B, he'll equal out probably by the end of next year or early 2013. Even if he moves to being a part-time DH, he'll still likely end up with more 3B time than SS. How did James approach other guys who split their time almost equally between two positions? If ARod doesn't currently belong on the SS list, he certainly doesn't belong on the 3B list, which seems silly.

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By: ML Stille http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-115984 Fri, 27 May 2011 11:47:06 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-115984 Well said John M. I would like to add another comment regarding "milestones". Baseball is NOT a stagnant game, records and "milestones" will be broke and changed. Every HOF voter has the responsibilty to assure only the best of the best gets into the HOF. Ruth, Gherig, Musial, Mays,Aaron,Cobb,T. Williams,ect accomplishments will stand the test of time for their overall contributions. I'm not sure Brock,Killebrew,McCovey,Murray, ect accomplishments will however. Just one mans opinion!

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By: John M http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-115896 Fri, 27 May 2011 01:35:58 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-115896 RobM - I would have to agree with you. I'm no Yankee fan, but I do believe that he's definitely among the top shortstops ever. In fact, when I glance at the Top 5 in Bill James Baseball Abstract - I think you could easily make a case for him making the top spot. I think he's easily the equal of the #2 man (Arky Vaughan) and I think his postseason resume ranks him - overall - above Ripken too. It's hard to compare him with Honus Wagner, because the game looked totally different a hundred years ago. Defensively, Jeter's no Ozzie, but he's been quite capable overall and "the flip" remains the most heads-up play I've ever seen. He's top 5 for sure, to me. Whether he gets to 3000 hits or not 🙂

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By: John M http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-115893 Fri, 27 May 2011 01:29:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-115893 I got a lot of mileage out of my 3000 hit comment!!

I think to rephrase...it's not so much that I think the players with 3000 hits shouldn't be in the Hall, but it seems that several players with overall credentials as good as some 3000 hit performers have a much harder road. I mentioned Brock/Raines, but you could also state a case for Yount/Trammell too. How about Fred McGriff/Eddie Murray? Both were the steady, reliable power hitting first baseman, but Murray simply played more years and got to both 3000 hits and 500 homers; but McGriff had BOTH a higher OBP and slugging percentage.

I'm not complaining about any of Brock, Yount or Murray being in the Hall, and while I'm a big believer Raines should be in, I'm not necessarily advocating Trammell or McGriff either. But my real point - is that when it comes to voting for a HOFer, the chasm between players seems widened by the 3000 hit margin. Yount and Murray made the Hall based on great skill, great performance AND longevity. Trammell and McGriff were the equal of Yount and Murray, save for the longevity. Trammell and McGriff should be near misses in the voting, and they're not close right now.

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By: RobM http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-115793 Thu, 26 May 2011 21:25:06 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-115793 @45 franco Says: I am SO weary of the "Jeter is a demi-god" point of view.
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I have seen little, if any, of that here. This is generally an area for thoughtful analysis of players, although there are trolls and out-of-leftfield comments even here. Perhaps you don't like Jeter because he's been the face of the Yankees, but he can now, give or take, be ranked as one of the top-ten shortstops of all time in the approximate 140-year history of MLB. He is what he is. A HOFer. Some can say they are weary of the hype, but there are others who are weary of the knee-jerk reactions against Jeter. Your comment sound very typical of that crowd. No insight. No thought.

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By: kingturtle http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/11230/comment-page-1#comment-115762 Thu, 26 May 2011 18:23:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=11230#comment-115762 I'm still not sure what this measures. A guy with 600 AB, 200 H, 50 HR and 100 K has a .333 BABIP. A guy with 600 AB, 200 H, 10 HR and 50 K has a .352 BABIP. Wouldn't you rather have the guy with 200 H and 50 HR?

So Carew, Boggs and Jeter are higher on the list, and Aaron's 755 dingers drops him way down. What exactly does this list tell us?

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