Comments on: Card of the (ahem) Week: 1979 Topps #336 Bobby Thompson http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: ELIZABETH ALEXANDER http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-111379 Mon, 09 May 2011 11:54:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-111379 I AGREE WITH WHAT HAS BEEN SAID ABOUT MY BROTHER-IN-LAW ITS GOOD TO HAVE SOMEONE FAMOUS IN THE FAMILY I MARRIED INTO THE THOMPSON FAMILY THATS WHEN I FIRST GOT INTO BASEBALL THEY WELCOMED ME WITH OPEN ARMS AND I LOVE HIM AND THE FAMILY FOR IT. HE IS GETTING SOME REST NOW AND IN NO PAIN. BRO I LOVE YOU AND MISS YOU. THE THOMPSON FAMILY WAS A BASEBALL FAMILY AS SAID BEFORE IT STATED WITH THE DAD EDWARD THOMPSON SR. EDWARD THOMPSON JR. WHOM I WAS MARRIED TO BEFORE HIS DEATH. BOBBY WAS THE ONLY ONE OF THE FAMILY WHO WENT PRO. BUT ALFRED PLAY ALSO AND HAS WROTE A BOOK ABOUT BASEBALL. HE WOULD STILL BE PLAYING IF HE HAD NOT HAD THE ACCIDENT WHICH LEFT HIM PARALYZED.

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By: Mark http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-111333 Mon, 09 May 2011 03:56:08 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-111333 What a great tribute! That's exactly why I like this site so much. Bobby Thompson wasn't a Hall of Famer or an All-Star, but this site digs deeper to unearth the fascinating tidbits that make his baseball story so interesting.

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By: Andy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110800 Fri, 06 May 2011 18:17:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110800 I just wanted to say thanks to those of you who knew Mr. Thompson for sharing your thoughts on our blog. It's our privilege to get to write about someone who was so clearly loved by his friends and family.

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By: ELIZABETH ALEXANDER http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110798 Fri, 06 May 2011 18:07:54 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110798 THOSE WERE THE GOOD TIMES WHEN MY BROTHER-IN-LAW BOBBY THOMPSON WAS PLAYING FOR THE TEXAS RANGERS. HE IS SURELY GOING TO BE MISSED BY THE FAMILY AND FRIENDS AND THOSE WHO KNEW HIM WHEN HE PLAYED PRO. HE IS LOOKING DOWN ON US AS WE MAKE ALL THE COMMENTS ON HIS CAREER. LOVE YOU BRO MISS YOU.

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By: 704_Brave http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110758 Fri, 06 May 2011 15:01:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110758 Ken,
Thanks for the insight! You were a trailblazer here in Charlotte too...first African-American news anchor at WBTV if I recall correctly. Any info on why those Meck. Co. semi-pro teams went defunct? I wonder if there are any other such leagues around today?

You've certainly seen a lot in Charlotte over the years. Thanks for the info on Bobby...it sure has been interesting learning about him and if you have any other tidbits to share, we'd be very appreciative!

Thanks again

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By: Ken Koontz http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110530 Fri, 06 May 2011 00:16:23 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110530 WOW!!! How truly special these posts are about my friend and former teammate Bobby LaRue Thompson. When his major leagues days ended (no, I do not recall specifics), he returned home and joined his brothers Edward/"Chubby"(pitcher/outfielder) and Alfred/"Gu-Baby"(second baseman) with the Morris Field Rangers. The Rangers, under manager Herman Thomas, was a grand collection of talent that won at least seven consecutive titles in the now-defunct Triple County Semi-Pro Baseball League and also once called the Mecklenburg County Semi-Pro Baseball League. I was a rag-armed pitcher who was really the "old man" (then in my early 30s) on the youth-filled team of talent. After seven years with the Rangers more as a PR-type/player, I "retired" from the team and league because my job as a televisuion newsman promoted me to weekend news anchor. And our games were Saturday/Sundays. I never worried about striking anybody out (usually couldn't anyway) because I had a GREAT DEFENSE playing behind me...and they were always alert and ready because when I was on the mound, the ball was always smacked into play somewhere...and they delivered. "Bull" was a leader and every team around the league respected the "dashing" Morris Field Rangers. A few other players from those years of the mid-seventies went on to Minor League experiences: Mark Funderburk/Orlando & Minnesota Twins system; Kevin Staley/LA Dodgers system; Bob Falls(later years); Randy Falls; Bobby Reynolds; Timmy and Murphy Morris and others whose names I likely have forgotten. The Rangers were young, incredibly fast, powerful, confident, fearless, well-coached and always took the field with the expectation of winning and then delivering the victory...even when I was on the mound, as rare as it may have been. Many of those guys went on to great non-baseball professional careers including school teachers, educators, coaches, common laborers, public servants. But, "Bull" was at times "the face" of the Rangers, the idol of his teammates and the teacher from whom many guys learned to play the game even better. As we all have, "Bull" faced some challenges, but like the true winner and competitor he was at his core, he overcame those challenges in grand fashion. And in closing, he got his name from his dad who told the story that Bobby was born on the day of that "hit heard round the world." Ed Thompson's favorite major leaguer was "Bobby" Thompson, and his favorite cowboy was Lash LaRue. Thus, on that day of his son's birth, he proclaimed the name for his to be "Bobby LaRue Thompson." He was destined at birth to be great. Now he and his dad, brother "Chubby", manager Herman "Dad" Thomas, and all the other greats from the Triple County League, the Minor Leagues and the Majors share an eternal peace. And yet they live as long as we remember them.

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By: DoubleDiamond http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110516 Thu, 05 May 2011 23:21:57 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110516 @14, 17, 20 Is it possible that he went to Japan or another foreign league? Or did you already check that?

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By: jim (gcrl) http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110362 Thu, 05 May 2011 12:04:03 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110362 andy - nice to see a card of the week post again!

i posted the 1978 burger king card a while back, if anyone is interested in seeing what it looks like:

http://garveyceyrusselllopes.blogspot.com/2010/04/i-wish-i-could-have-had-it-my-way-in.html

@nash - in 1990, target issued an sga set of every player to have appeared in a game for the dodgers as part of their 100th anniversary. over 1000 cards.

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By: Cap http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110360 Thu, 05 May 2011 11:58:14 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110360 nice feature. good job and thanks!

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By: Stu Baron http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10947/comment-page-1#comment-110355 Thu, 05 May 2011 11:43:02 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10947#comment-110355 @Leporshia: Great post - sounds like a fascinating family. Do you know why Bobby stopped playing after 1978?

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