Comments on: Teams Who Won @ Home Often http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393 This and that about baseball stats. Tue, 16 Jul 2013 17:01:55 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Dvd Avins http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101760 Sat, 26 Mar 2011 14:42:16 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101760 @25, I don't know why, but that's the best and funniest thing I've read in a while. Thank you.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101728 Sat, 26 Mar 2011 07:13:56 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101728 The 1961 Yankees lost just 16 home games all year -- and 4 of those losses came in a 6-game homestand from May 12-17. They split 4 games with Detroit, then welcomed the expansion Senators to Yankee stadium by dropping a 2-game series that drew a total of 16,000 to the big ballpark.

They also had homestands of 12-0 (including a 5-game series sweep), 10-1, 9-2, and 15-4 in 17 days (including three 4-game sweeps).

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101725 Sat, 26 Mar 2011 06:49:03 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101725 Can't believe I have to correct myself so quickly, but I just realized that the '94 Rockies drew even more fans per game than their first year (though in a shorter schedule), and won only 25 home games -- so they averaged over 131,000 per home win.

P.S. Putting the Rockies' 1993 attendance into context: Over 2.3 million fans walked out of their park after witnessing a home loss -- about the same number as went through the home turnstiles all year in 2007, when they won the pennant.

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By: John Autin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101724 Sat, 26 Mar 2011 06:39:10 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101724 @35, TheGoof -- I'm not going to do the tedious research to prove it, but I'd bet that the highest ratio of attendance to wins was achieved by the 1993 Rockies, who drew almost 4.5 million and won 39 home games, or 115,000 per home win.

As for the lowest ratio ... I'm not sure how official or complete some of the attendance numbers are on B-R. (For instance, the 1935 Browns' attendance is listed as less than 81,000. But only about 1/4 of their individual home games have attendance info; the listed attendance figures (all in round numbers) add up to about 37,000.) Anyway, if we take the total attendance figure as accurate, those Browns drew a little less than 3,000 per home win. I can't imagine any team doing worse. The 1918 Braves are listed with about 84,000 season attendance, but they only won 23 home games (season shortened by WWI), so over 3,600 per home win.

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By: TheGoof http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101445 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 18:55:45 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101445 A few thoughts:

Every team with at least 59 wins has made the playoffs or been within reach on the last day of the season.

Noting the Browns' lousy record and attendance, I'm curious about the highest and lowest ratios of attendance/wins.

Is it just me, or should it be Bucky E. Dent? Effin' starts with an E. Sox fans don't know how to do anything right...

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By: Lawrence Azrin http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101407 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 15:20:06 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101407 @20/ TheIronHorse Says: "The top 2 teams on this list that did not make the postseason are Boston at numbers 6 and 14."

And both times, they lost to the Yankees; in 1949, after leading by one game with two to go, and losing the final two games in Yankee Stadium; then in 1978, losing the "Bucky %@?#! Dent" playoff in Fenway Park.

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By: Nash Bruce http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101365 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 10:01:00 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101365 @#7 Larry R.............feeling your pain, did Joe Carter really hit that homer, was Mitch Williams really that used up, career over, by the '93 Series???? (answer, of course: yes)

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By: Mike Felber http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101354 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 08:17:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101354 This is another instance where it serves no useful purpose to give the unadjusted stats. Why list most wins when for most of baseball history teams had 8 less games scheduled? It is like not adjusting for era or park, the former usually the bigger factor, when listing stats that measure productivity, like wOPS +.

Let us just start with home winning %. That is what is meaningful, not a list distorted by chances (games played).

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By: Gerry http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101303 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 02:19:33 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101303 #30, no team from the 1980s shows up in that top 20. The best home winning percentage of the 1980s was .725, by the 1985 Yankees, 58-22 at home.

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By: Raphy http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/archives/10393/comment-page-1#comment-101299 Thu, 24 Mar 2011 01:33:15 +0000 http://www.baseball-reference.com/blog/?p=10393#comment-101299 You can find the best winning % (as well as most wins and fewest losses) by using the situational record finder. Here are the best home winning percentages since 1901.

Rk Tm Year G W L W-L% RS RA pythW-L%
1 NYY 1932 77 62 15 .805 482 300 .704
2 NYY 1961 81 65 16 .802 411 251 .711
3 PHA 1931 75 60 15 .800 446 289 .689
4 BOS 1949 77 61 16 .792 514 310 .716
5 BOS 1946 78 61 16 .792 469 315 .674
6 CIN 1975 81 64 17 .790 457 275 .717
7 PIT 1902 71 56 15 .789 410 207 .777
8 PHA 1929 74 57 16 .781 484 302 .703
9 STL 1942 78 60 17 .779 419 229 .751
10 BRO 1953 78 60 17 .779 517 333 .691
11 PHA 1902 73 56 17 .767 477 330 .662
12 CLE 1954 77 59 18 .766 376 252 .675
13 NYY 1998 81 62 19 .765 472 314 .678
14 PHA 1930 76 58 18 .763 485 329 .670
15 CHC 1910 77 58 19 .753 354 231 .686
16 NYY 1942 77 58 19 .753 394 226 .734
17 DET 1909 78 57 19 .750 377 246 .686
18 NYY 1927 77 57 19 .750 479 267 .745
19 PHA 1910 78 57 19 .750 339 212 .702
20 CLE 1995 72 54 18 .750 400 272 .669
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/23/2011.

The highest ranked team of the 2000's is #63 overall - the 2001 Mariners who were 57-24 (.704) at home.

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