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1,000 IP With WHIP = 1.5+

Posted by Steve Lombardi on March 13, 2011

How many pitchers have thrown at least 1,000 big league innings since 1901 and fashioned a career H+BB/IP mark of 1.5 or greater?

Here's the list -

Rk Player WHIP IP From To Age G GS CG SHO GF W L W-L% SV H R ER BB SO ERA ERA+ HR BF IBB HBP BK WP Tm
1 Chief Hogsett 1.646 1222.0 1929 1944 25-40 330 114 37 2 161 63 87 .420 33 1511 829 682 501 441 5.02 94 85 5614   60 0 18 DET-TOT-SLB-WSH
2 Jimmy Haynes 1.632 1200.2 1995 2004 22-31 227 203 2 1 11 63 89 .414 1 1358 778 717 601 762 5.37 83 148 5417 41 30 3 51 BAL-OAK-MIL-CIN
3 Jack Wilson 1.621 1131.2 1934 1942 22-30 281 121 50 5 98 68 72 .486 20 1233 686 577 601 590 4.59 103 73 5158   18 3 37 PHA-BOS-TOT
4 Ken Chase 1.615 1165.0 1936 1943 22-29 188 160 62 4 18 53 84 .387 1 1188 647 553 694 582 4.27 97 55 5283   15 3 53 WSH-BOS-TOT
5 Tommy Byrne 1.597 1362.0 1943 1957 23-37 281 170 65 12 72 85 69 .552 12 1138 688 622 1037 766 4.11 97 98 6181 10 85 4 28 NYY-TOT-SLB
6 Gordon Rhodes 1.595 1048.2 1929 1936 21-28 200 135 47 1 34 43 74 .368 5 1196 676 565 477 356 4.85 95 74 4759   10 2 19 NYY-TOT-BOS-PHA
7 Vern Kennedy 1.591 2025.2 1934 1945 27-38 344 263 126 7 56 104 132 .441 5 2173 1202 1052 1049 691 4.67 95 130 9055   24 4 54 CHW-DET-TOT-SLB-CLE
8 Percy Jones 1.590 1026.0 1920 1930 20-30 251 114 49 8 87 53 57 .482 6 1137 588 495 494 381 4.34 96 53 4611   40 2 20 CHC-BSN-PIT
9 Jamey Wright 1.574 1760.1 1996 2010 21-35 466 246 6 3 55 83 118 .413 0 1902 1087 978 868 968 5.00 95 185 7850 56 137 13 71 COL-MIL-TOT-KCR-SFG-TEX
10 Hank Johnson 1.570 1066.1 1925 1939 19-33 249 116 45 4 81 63 56 .529 11 1107 665 563 567 568 4.75 89 89 4828 2 32 4 33 NYY-BOS-PHA-CIN
11 Bobby Witt 1.569 2465.0 1986 2001 22-37 430 397 47 11 13 142 157 .475 0 2493 1449 1324 1375 1955 4.83 91 252 11003 37 39 26 128 TEX-TOT-OAK-TBD-CLE-ARI
12 Jack Knott 1.560 1557.0 1933 1946 26-39 325 192 62 4 77 82 103 .443 19 1787 991 860 642 484 4.97 95 140 7007   20 7 42 SLB-TOT-CHW-PHA
13 Alex Ferguson 1.560 1241.2 1918 1929 21-32 257 166 62 2 54 61 85 .418 10 1455 778 680 482 397 4.93 85 68 5573 52 45 5 14 NYY-BOS-TOT-WSH-PHI
14 Jason Jennings 1.558 1128.1 2001 2009 22-30 225 180 6 3 8 62 74 .456 1 1253 661 621 505 749 4.95 98 137 5032 41 34 1 51 COL-HOU-TEX
15 Buck Ross 1.551 1365.1 1936 1945 21-30 237 182 65 6 33 56 95 .371 2 1545 882 749 573 360 4.94 88 114 6141   7 2 38 PHA-TOT-CHW
16 Pat Rapp 1.550 1387.1 1992 2001 24-33 259 239 9 5 7 70 91 .435 0 1468 790 721 683 825 4.68 96 133 6143 32 49 1 70 SFG-FLA-TOT-KCR-BOS-BAL-ANA
17 Jason Bere 1.549 1111.0 1993 2003 22-32 211 203 4 0 2 71 65 .522 0 1095 694 634 626 920 5.14 86 145 4987 25 29 1 51 CHW-TOT-CHC-CLE
18 Lil Stoner 1.548 1003.2 1922 1931 23-32 229 111 45 1 72 50 58 .463 14 1180 623 531 374 299 4.76 87 62 4466 29 28 1 24 DET-PIT-PHI
19 Sheriff Blake 1.547 1620.0 1920 1937 20-37 304 195 81 11 60 87 102 .460 8 1766 876 744 740 621 4.13 102 68 7150   30 0 35 PIT-CHC-TOT
20 Roy Mahaffey 1.546 1056.0 1926 1936 22-32 224 129 45 0 46 67 49 .578 5 1181 673 588 452 365 5.01 91 84 4768   27 0 31 PIT-PHA-SLB
21 Brian Bohanon 1.539 1116.0 1990 2001 21-32 304 157 8 2 26 54 60 .474 2 1229 706 643 489 671 5.19 94 142 4993 25 58 2 42 TEX-DET-TOR-NYM-TOT-COL
22 Jesse Jefferson 1.539 1085.2 1973 1981 24-32 237 144 25 4 40 39 81 .325 1 1151 642 580 520 522 4.81 83 118 4786 23 14 10 33 BAL-TOT-CHW-TOR-CAL
23 Phil Collins 1.539 1324.1 1923 1935 21-33 292 142 64 4 111 80 85 .485 24 1541 784 686 497 423 4.66 99 125 5934   37 6 13 CHC-PHI-TOT
24 Dick Coffman 1.537 1460.1 1927 1945 20-38 472 132 47 8 194 72 95 .431 38 1782 894 755 463 372 4.65 96 92 6526   35 1 17 WSH-SLB-TOT-NYG-BSN-PHI
25 Joe Coleman 1.533 1134.0 1942 1955 19-32 223 140 60 11 55 52 76 .406 6 1172 616 552 566 444 4.38 92 92 4993 0 13 2 19 PHA-BAL-TOT
26 Scott Karl 1.530 1002.0 1995 2000 23-28 178 161 5 1 4 54 56 .491 0 1164 594 536 369 513 4.81 100 120 4444 18 33 3 26 MIL-TOT
27 Ed Wells 1.530 1232.1 1923 1934 23-34 291 140 54 7 92 68 69 .496 13 1417 750 637 468 403 4.65 91 78 5487 27 12 5 13 DET-NYY-SLB
28 Shawn Estes 1.529 1678.1 1995 2008 22-35 283 281 14 8 0 101 93 .521 0 1708 950 879 858 1210 4.71 91 158 7403 36 57 9 79 SFG-TOT-CHC-COL-ARI-SDP
29 Ken Holloway 1.523 1160.0 1922 1930 24-32 285 110 43 4 100 64 52 .552 18 1370 684 567 397 293 4.40 95 50 5146 31 37 4 13 DET-CLE-TOT
30 Turk Lown 1.519 1032.0 1951 1962 27-38 504 49 10 1 255 55 61 .474 73 978 525 472 590 574 4.12 97 105 4574 40 10 1 33 CHC-TOT-CHW
31 Mickey McDermott 1.518 1316.2 1948 1961 19-32 291 156 54 11 86 69 69 .500 14 1161 655 572 838 757 3.91 106 86 5801 8 28 7 39 BOS-WSH-NYY-KCA-DET-TOT
32 Charlie Robertson 1.518 1005.0 1919 1928 23-32 166 141 60 6 17 49 80 .380 1 1149 570 496 377 310 4.44 90 38 4453 43 17 2 16 CHW-SLB-BSN
33 Ownie Carroll 1.517 1330.2 1925 1934 22-31 248 153 71 2 60 64 90 .416 5 1532 808 655 486 311 4.43 89 61 5900 2 48 1 42 DET-TOT-CIN-BRO
34 Bill Wight 1.516 1563.0 1946 1958 24-36 347 198 66 15 59 77 99 .438 8 1656 791 686 714 574 3.95 103 74 6851 7 14 7 45 NYY-CHW-BOS-TOT-BAL
35 Carl Scheib 1.516 1070.2 1943 1954 16-27 267 107 47 6 125 45 65 .409 17 1130 634 581 493 290 4.88 85 99 4714   30 6 35 PHA-TOT
36 Dixie Davis 1.516 1318.2 1912 1926 21-35 239 164 77 10 46 75 71 .514 2 1311 722 581 688 460 3.97 107 63 5799 64 45 2 22 CIN-CHW-PHI-SLB
37 Walt Masterson 1.515 1649.2 1939 1956 19-36 399 184 70 15 115 78 100 .438 20 1613 888 760 886 815 4.15 97 101 7281 1 28 1 33 WSH-TOT-BOS-DET
38 Randy Lerch 1.514 1099.1 1975 1986 20-31 253 164 18 2 31 60 64 .484 3 1232 612 553 432 507 4.53 83 101 4829 26 10 7 39 PHI-MIL-TOT-SFG
39 Hugh Mulcahy 1.513 1161.2 1935 1947 21-33 220 145 63 5 47 45 89 .336 9 1271 695 579 487 314 4.49 90 69 5161   39 3 36 PHI-PIT
40 Elam Vangilder 1.512 1715.2 1919 1929 23-33 367 187 90 13 120 99 102 .493 19 1894 1014 815 700 474 4.28 101 92 7568 96 42 3 22 SLB-DET
41 Vic Sorrell 1.511 1671.2 1928 1937 27-36 280 216 95 8 41 92 101 .477 10 1820 949 823 706 619 4.43 102 101 7403   20 0 25 DET
42 Kip Wells 1.510 1301.0 1999 2009 22-32 289 212 3 2 24 67 99 .404 2 1349 750 681 615 944 4.71 94 145 5801 52 69 3 63 CHW-PIT-TOT-STL
43 Milt Gaston 1.508 2105.0 1924 1934 28-38 355 269 127 10 63 97 164 .372 8 2338 1277 1064 836 615 4.55 97 114 9271 17 24 7 78 NYY-SLB-WSH-BOS-CHW
44 Bruce Ruffin 1.506 1268.0 1986 1997 22-33 469 152 17 3 160 60 82 .423 63 1345 677 591 565 843 4.19 99 92 5569 50 10 3 61 PHI-MIL-COL
45 Bill Krueger 1.505 1194.1 1983 1995 25-37 301 164 9 2 34 68 66 .507 4 1305 685 577 493 639 4.35 92 104 5257 32 24 10 70 OAK-TOT-LAD-MIL-SEA-DET
46 Doug Davis 1.504 1670.0 1999 2010 23-34 297 277 7 3 4 91 101 .474 0 1754 883 813 757 1243 4.38 104 178 7373 27 42 10 63 TEX-TOT-MIL-ARI
47 Bill Hallahan 1.504 1740.1 1925 1938 22-35 324 224 90 14 52 102 94 .520 8 1838 915 779 779 856 4.03 102 71 7624   8 4 71 STL-TOT-CIN-PHI
48 Rollie Naylor 1.503 1011.0 1917 1924 25-32 181 136 67 2 28 42 83 .336 0 1174 584 442 346 282 3.93 102 34 4364 42 17 2 22 PHA
49 Bill Dietrich 1.501 2003.2 1933 1948 23-38 366 253 92 17 72 108 128 .458 11 2117 1146 997 890 660 4.48 92 128 8874   22 4 44 PHA-TOT-CHW
50 Bump Hadley 1.501 2945.2 1926 1941 21-36 528 355 135 14 108 161 165 .494 25 2980 1609 1389 1442 1318 4.24 105 167 13016   63 5 72 WSH-TOT-SLB-NYY
51 Ron Villone 1.500 1168.0 1995 2009 25-39 717 93 2 0 168 61 65 .484 8 1115 665 614 637 925 4.73 96 136 5193 39 68 2 48 TOT-MIL-CLE-CIN-PIT-HOU-SEA-NYY-STL-WSN
52 George Caster 1.500 1377.2 1934 1946 26-38 376 127 62 6 169 76 100 .432 39 1469 833 695 597 595 4.54 96 121 6096   25 5 15 PHA-SLB-TOT-DET
53 Earl Whitehill 1.500 3564.2 1923 1939 24-40 541 473 226 16 47 218 185 .541 11 3917 2018 1726 1431 1350 4.36 100 192 15781 40 101 6 43 DET-WSH-CLE-CHC
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 3/13/2011.

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Seeing Jimmy Haynes here at #2 brings back memories. In the mid-90's, he was considered one of the "Top Five" (or so) pitching prospects in all of baseball. He did great at A-ball, Double-A, and Triple-A. Check his early minor league stats. Many suggested that Haynes was the “next Mike Mussina” and was "can’t miss.”

TINSTAAPP, baby, TINSTAAPP...

In any event, check out the line for Roy "Popeye" Mahaffey. A winning record? Now, that's a trick, eh? (Yeah, I know, it was mostly thanks to his magic season in 1931.)

This entry was posted on Sunday, March 13th, 2011 at 9:16 am and is filed under Season Finders. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

29 Responses to “1,000 IP With WHIP = 1.5+”

  1. John Sickels Prospect Retro on Jimmy Haynes:
    http://www.minorleagueball.com/2007/4/28/134712/692

  2. Wow, that Tommy Byrne...1037 walks in 1362 IP! Here he is on a list of guys who can't find home plate with a GIS unit and a sherpa, and still no-one's close to him at that rate for that amount of pitching.

  3. @2
    Byrne led the league in HBP five times as well, so his WHIP is understated a bit. That was the "post-war walk boom" so everyone's walk rates were high, but Byrne led the league so it wasn't just the context. Somehow the Yankees got decent innings out of him though. I guess he set up a lot of DP's for Rizzuto and Coleman. Then later on, after the bottom teams of the league gave up on him, the Yankees got him back and somehow got a few more decent years out of him. Go figure.

  4. Several 1920s/1930s guys on the list who had halfway decent careers. Scoring levels were so high that 1.5 WHIP wasn't horrible. Guys like Earl Whitehill and Bump Hadley. They weren't stars but were solid middle-of-rotation guys.

  5. Morten Jonsson Says:

    Dixie Davis and Wild Bill Hallahan were pretty good pitchers too.

    I wonder if there's a way to refine this a little. It's strongly skewed toward pitchers from the twenties and thirties (especially Browns, I think--Sportsman's Park was a brutal place to pitch), from ca. 1950 (when walk rates were sky-high, as DavidRF points out), and Rockies. That tells us something about the conditions of the time, but not that much about the pitchers. I'd be more interested in seeing, say, the biggest discrepancies between WHIP and ERA. (This isn't a complaint--I'm just not smart enough to figure out how to do my own search for that.)

  6. The best thing I learned from this was that there was a pitcher from the 20's named Lil Stoner!

    But on a serious note, I always wondered how long it would take teams to realize Ron Villone didn't belong in anyone's bullpen. Apparently it took 14 years and ten teams...

    ~Andy

  7. On the list above, #2 and #9 appeared in the same rotation... two consecutive years. Ladies and gentlemen, your 2000-01 Milwaukee Brewers!

  8. @Andy Patton: Villone was hyped by Baseball America when he came up, so there was a perception that he could turn it around at any point. He was also a lefty, so he had that going for him too -- you know how many chances they get.

    And from age 33 onwards, after they stopped trying to use him as a starter, he was passable: 102 ERA+. Contrast with his age 30-32 seasons where his ERA+ was (ick) 82.

  9. Come to think of it, Shawn Estes had just about the same start to his career: much admired as a prospect and a lefty, and in his case actually not bad until he was 24 (if walk-eriffic). I seem to recall his arm fell off after that, though.

  10. A very quick scan of this list, but I noticed lots of 1930s and 1990s names on the list. Very high offensive times.

  11. There's a big (and quite understanable) gap lasting 10 seasons, from 1963 through 1972, when no one on the list was active. By way of contrast, 18 of these men were pitching in 1928.

  12. When I saw this title the first player I thought of was Jeff "OMG He Sucks" Fassero. But he was decent in the first few years of his career, and so his career WHIP was only 1.380.

    I gave him this nickname in 2004 when I was sitting in a poker room in Blackhawk, Colorado and was reading the newspaper. I read that the Rockies had signed Fassero, who was 41 at the time, and I yelled "Oh my god, he sucks!!!" And he rewarded us with a 3-8 record and a WHIP of 1.622 that year.

    P.S. He was still pitching in the major leagues (and getting bombed) at the age of 43. There must have been more to it than the fact he was a lefty. My theory is that he was somehow blackmailing the commissioner of baseball, but of course I don't have any proof.

  13. Lil Stoner (or Li'l Stoner, as I like to think of him) followed by Sheriff Blake. I like it. ;)

  14. Another guy I should have thought of right away, as a Rockies fan, is Jamey Wright. He pitched a few years for the Rockies at the beginning of his career, and might have been a worse pitcher than even Jeff Fassero. I think he was congenitally incapable of finishing an inning without two or three runners getting on base.

    So of course, he's still hanging around 15 years later.

  15. Phil Collins makes another appearance. Twice in one week!

  16. So THAT'S why he retired from singing. He's taking up baseball again.

  17. @1...very interesting link. @3, your mention of HBP seems very relevant here. Jamey Wright jumps even higher if HBP were included. Baserunners allowed / inning pitched (BAIP)...I guess it didn't sound as good as WHIP, but it tells a more complete story.

  18. John Autin Says:

    @13, Hylen -- Sheriff Blake did "follow" Lil Stoner onto the Phillies' roster in July 1931, but our hero and his 1.976 WHIP had been chased into the Texas League just a month earlier. Both were Cardinals farmhands in '32, but at different levels.

    P.S. Sheriff Blake was on the mound during one of the biggest World Series comebacks of all time -- game 4 of the 1929 WS -- and was charged with the loss, as the A's rallied from an 8-0 deficit with a 10-run 7th inning. Blake was the 3rd pitcher of the inning, after the lead had been chopped down to 1 run. Inheriting a runner on 1st, Blake allowed a single to Al Simmons, then another to Jimmie Foxx that tied the score; then Pat Malone came in and served up a 2-run double to Jimmy Dykes that put the A's on top. Lefty Grove relieved and struck out 4 of the 6 men he faced to earn the save. That win put the A's up by 3 games to 1, and they closed it out in game 5 by scoring 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th. Pat Malone (starting on 1 day's rest) carried a shutout and 2-0 lead into the 9th, but Mule Haas tied it with a 2-run HR, and Bing Miller doubled home Al Simmons for the walk-off win.

  19. @7
    "On the list above, #2 and #9 appeared in the same rotation... two consecutive years. Ladies and gentlemen, your 2000-01 Milwaukee Brewers!"

    Wright and Haynes were just trying to somehow make up for the hits and walks their lineup was supposed to provide. I believe the 2001 Brewers were the first to feature an entire team offense that had more strikeouts than hits for a single season.

  20. John Autin Says:

    @19, Biff, re: '01 Brewers having more Ks than Hits:

    That was quite a feat for its time, but the 2010 D'backs raised that bar a notch or two, with 163 more Ks than Hits -- a gap so wide that even if all of Justin Upton's 152 Ks were wiped off the books, they still would have had more Ks than Hits, and still would have led the majors in strikeouts.

    The D'backs had at least 131 Ks by every spot in the batting order, and at least 122 from every position in the field.

  21. Mike Felber Says:

    I want to echo & amplify what others here have said: It would be much more informative to have these all time lists be adjusted at least for the era. Otherwise it totally distorts what by implication it purports to measure: how good or bad a player is at a certain skill.

    This is not fair to the athletes, & tells us nada useful about who was good or bad at what.

  22. John Autin Says:

    Mike @21 & others -- You make a valid point about the importance of context when looking at raw numbers.

    At the same time, I don't agree that this list "by implication ... purports to measure [ ] how good or bad a player is at a certain skill." I don't see anything in Steve's text that says or implies that this is a list of bad pitchers. And by presenting a pretty full statistical record (including ERA+), the list does give us some tools to put the raw numbers into context.

    Morten asked for the biggest discrepancies between WHIP and ERA. Here are links to 2 P-I searches (I hope they work!): the first compares WHIP and ERA+, the second compares WHIP and raw ERA.

    Pitchers with 1,000+ IP and ERA+ more than 100 times their WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/watji

    Pitchers with 1,000+ IP and ERA less than 2.2 times their WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/Y2oXc

  23. John Autin Says:

    One of my links @22 didn't work, so I'll try to present them both again:

    Pitchers with 1,000+ IP and ERA+ more than 100 times their WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/blk3x

    Pitchers with 1,000+ IP and ERA less than 2.2 times their WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/Y2oXc

  24. John Autin Says:

    P.S. to my @22-23:
    One problem with trying to find "the greatest discrepancies" between WHIP and ERA (or ERA+) -- or, the problem with interpreting the lists I presented -- is that we haven't established what is a "normal" relation between those numbers. Is it linear? Exponential? I have no idea.

    I used ratios that were tailored to produce lists of 50 to 100 pitchers. But I don't know what those ratios mean, if anything.

    It also occurs to me that I should have included a minimum WHIP filter, in order to stay on the topic of pitchers with a high WHIP, so I'll post a couple more links with a minimum 1.4 WHIP (and min. 1,000 IP):

    ERA+ more than 70 times WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/VtLSF
    (Bob Wickman has the highest ratio in this group; his 126 ERA+ is exactly 90 times his 1.4 WHIP.)

    ERA less than 2.8 times WHIP:
    http://bbref.com/pi/shareit/YPi2r

  25. Mike Felber Says:

    True that it is not directly indicated that these guys are bad pitchers John. And you cannot be TOO bad & get a lot of IP. But I referred to a certain skill, WHIP, & clearly this list is showing who got a reasonable # of innings & was the worst at keeping this stat down. Unless it is specified that this was not era or otherwise adjusted, many will assume that this shows how good these guys are at keeping men off base in general.

    Why not just make it, & all similar lists, era adjusted? That would reflect on the pitcher in this basic skill, not be a list very distorted by era differentials.

  26. John Autin Says:

    Mike -- Your point is valid. Unfortunately, the Play Index search engine doesn't provide a direct means of making era adjustments for most of the searchable stats. With a few exceptions -- OPS+, ERA+, and the WAR group -- one can only search on the raw numbers.

  27. Mike Felber Says:

    Ah well, thanks for the information. I cannot demand others do the work I am unable to do, or unwilling to learn now!

  28. Why has Doug Davis hung around all of these years? He has always seemed pretty pointless to me.

  29. John Autin Says:

    @28, Wat -- I'm not a big Doug Davis fan, but ... For the 6 years 2004-09, Davis averaged almost 200 IP and a 109 ERA+ -- and he did it for an average salary of less than $5 million. There are probably 100 MLB pitchers earning more money while providing less value.

    Also, Davis never really had a bad year until last year, when he was hurt. A 10-year run of reliably acceptable performance, and usually better than average, is something of real value.